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I have continuity between the two pole of the power cord of my fridge when I unplug it.Is this normal situation or I have a short cut

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    Your question is very ambiguous. Please consider editing it and add some significant detail. First of all, are you having an actual problem? Next, what do you mean by "continuity"? Please be SPECIFIC! I'm not 100% sure about "short cut" but if you mean "short circuit" I would expect your circuit breaker to trip if you had one. – jwh20 Oct 1 '20 at 20:49
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    Are you measuring your fridge out of curiosity of is there a problem you're trying to diagnose? – brhans Oct 1 '20 at 22:09
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Presumably the inside of the refrigerator has warmed enough that the thermostat is calling for cooling. Therefore, the motor is trying to start. That means it is attempting to pull "Locked Rotor Amperage" from the power supply, which is considerable. So Barry's answer applies; just change "transformer" to "motor" (since they are quite similar anyway).

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  • Yeah, DCR on a substantial motor winding will be in the low ohms to milliohms – ThreePhaseEel Oct 1 '20 at 23:49
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I am assuming that you are not experiencing a problem at this time. Most likely, there is a motor inside the refrigerator with the run winding connected to the power cord. If you measure the resistance between the prongs of the cord with a ohmmeter, then you are measuring the DC resistance of the motor run winding. This will be low (maybe 10's of ohms) although not a direct short (say less than 1 ohm). As pointed out, if there were a real short circuit, then the circuit breaker would blow.

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  • Power supplies and motors can show very low DC resistances that look like a short. I have seen this trip up 4th year apprentices. – Ed Beal Oct 1 '20 at 23:24

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