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I just started to renovate my apartment in an old building. I removed the paint from the walls, but when i started to remove it from the ceiling I noticed it was fitted with polystyrene sheets.

I thought that it was glued, but to my unfortunate surprise adhesive, cement i think. It was used to bind it to a wall. How do I remove it without damaging the ceiling? I read that chemicals are used on bricks but not sure about wall?

Also underneath cement is from what I can see paint on a plaster (i think its called that in English)

I would be really grateful for any help, or do i have to call somebody with more experience?

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  • Are you sure that’s not the structure? Those bubbles look way two deep for glue. – Ed Beal Aug 20 at 17:11
  • Bubbles are from Styrofoam™ sheets and it is only on this ceiling – MePo Aug 20 at 17:16
  • Also I checked the rest. It was as someone used cement as binding material for Styrofoam™ sheets on this one – MePo Aug 20 at 17:26
  • Ok maybe an epoxy / construction adhesive ? Language may be a difference here. Do you know what is above that “cement” or epoxy / construction adhesive? Layer ? Wood. Concrete, wall board or Sheetrock? – Ed Beal Aug 20 at 17:47
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    Ok that makes sense I think @freeman was thinking the same as I was. Epoxy will usually chip off when it is that thick but it is a lot of work. If you can find a proper solvent you could paint it on , I would use a demo drill/hammer with a wide chipping blade. If you have equipment rentals they should have an electric demo drill /hammed is what they are called here like a sds tool with the chisel instead of a drill bit, more expensive than a drill but handy if you do a lot of remodeling. – Ed Beal Aug 20 at 18:59
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C&P from comments as requested:

Epoxy will usually chip off when it is that thick but it is a lot of work. If you can find a proper solvent you could paint it on , I would use a demo drill/hammer with a wide chipping blade. If you have equipment rentals they should have an electric demo drill /hammer is what they are called here like a sds tool with the chisel instead of a drill bit, more expensive than a drill but handy if you do a lot of remodeling.

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I would venture to say that if you remove that cement, the people in the apartment above you would land in your apartment. Your entire building is probably made of poured concrete and you're seeing the bottom of the upstairs apartment's floor.

The Styrofoam™ sheets you're seeing are for sound and thermal insulation between your apartment and the one above.

I'd suggest that you'll want to cut off the torn Styrofoam to create neat, square edges, replace it, then paint over it.

Also, you say "apartment" - to me, that implies that you're renting. I presume you have permission to do the renovation work? Often landlords don't like it when you start messing with their property without permission...

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  • No it isnt rental sorry for my english, im at the last floor and the cement was used as "glue" for the Styrofoam sheets i am sure because in my bathroom for example the ceiling is only paint so i can safley say that it was used as "glue" – MePo Aug 20 at 17:01
  • Also i can see patches of wall underneath it as it was done very sloppy – MePo Aug 20 at 17:03
  • @MePo It may help if you added a picture of the bathroom ceiling to your original question showing what the ceiling material there looks like once the paint's been removed. And don't worry about your English - it's far better than my skills in your native tongue. – FreeMan Aug 20 at 17:06
  • 2nd picture is from bathroom i did not start with it i just took some small amount of paint from it... its normal wall no cement in that color. Also it was just one small coat of putty over the Styrofoam so i am sure it is not from the structure – MePo Aug 20 at 17:20
  • Why not just finish off the surface of the cement binder with a thin coating of plaster after removing the styrofoam? What was the finish that was covering the styrofoam? – Programmer66 Aug 20 at 17:46

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