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There is a metal junction box sticking up 6" out of the ground mounted to the top of a piece of conduit. There is a rubber gasket and metal cover screwed to the box. Inside the box is simply six wires, 2 black, 2 white, 2 ground, each pair wire nutted together. I want to connect a 120V 15A receptacle to the wires, put the entire receptacle inside the box, and close the lid, making sure no screws can be shorted. Is this acceptable?

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    What do these wire feed? What size are they? A picture of the box, inside, would be helpful. – JACK Aug 12 at 16:56
  • This is at a business. The wires feed outdoor lighting. I do not know why the junction was necessary, maybe there was another light in that location originally. The wires are 12 gauge. I do not have a picture but it is the same as images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/… – Jorabi Aug 12 at 17:30
  • Standard bell box commonly used for outdoor locations. It can be blanked off OR a proper cover used for a receptacle. There are single gang and double gang boxes most commonly used. There are single yoke covers for both types of boxes. the double gang cover I use has 55 configurations, the single gang only has 8 configurations both are lockable. – Ed Beal Aug 12 at 18:08
  • FYI the point is that I need to stick a small camera to the back of the box and not make a new outlet available to anyone. My thought was to push a new receptacle in toward the back of the box, then plug the small 5V 1A USB adapter into it for the camera, the put the lid back on. From other responses it sounds like the right thing to do is install a GFCI outlet on the front of the box where it belongs, then get one of those weatherproof covers that comes way out in the front, so the usb adapter would fit. Now I'm looking for one that is solid grey (not translucent), and that I can SCREW shut. – Jorabi Aug 12 at 18:23
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    You probably should've asked how to do that, then. See xyproblem.info. – isherwood Aug 12 at 18:24
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Outlets have to be secured to the junction box feeding them. You can put an outlet there but since it's outdoors, it would have to be GFCI protected, preferably at the main panel. If not there, then a GFCI outlet would need to be installed in the box. You could then put a locking cover over the outlet similar to the one shown below. You'd want to check that the existing lighting load and future load of the outlet won't exceed the breaker rating. You might need a box extender depending on what exactly is in the field.

enter image description here

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    Jack is that an in use cover it doesn’t look like it and would not be code compliant any longer. The location of the GFCI is opinion, a lighting circuit may not require one but the receptacle will so a GFCI receptacle May be a better choice and it is easy to reset. Note I do have lockable In use or extra duty covers. – Ed Beal Aug 12 at 17:56
  • @EdBeal You're right. I posted the wrong download. This one is in use. – JACK Aug 12 at 18:14
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    Yup that’s the exact one I use 8 in one by Hubble – Ed Beal Aug 12 at 18:18
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That is called a bell box and yes you can add a receptacle to it if not on a GFCI circuit you could use a WR rated GFCI with a extra duty or in use cover and this would be code compliant. And yes it needs to also be tamper resistant. I use these boxes as junction boxes all the time with a blank cover but when adding the receptacle a special cover is required to keep the rain off or out of the receptacle.

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  • good note on WR rated GFCI. I keep forgetting that, they are new since my working days+1 – JACK Aug 12 at 18:19
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Assuming your circuit is suitable for adding a receptacle in-line (e.g. not a dedicated circuit for a pump, or some type of switched circuit if you don't want the plug going on/off), you could install a receptacle in the box. To make that proper, you would need to install a 20A GFCI receptacle with a weatherproof "in-use" cover that allows you to use the plug while the box is closed (the flat types aren't up to code anymore although they are still sold). They have metal ones with holes for a padlock if you think you might have issues with random people using it.

enter image description here

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    The op stated a lighting circuit. The circuit could be GFCI protected at the breaker and lately we have been forgetting it also requires tamper resistance on the receptacles I got hit on that last year and they do make WR tamper resistant GFCI receptacles. – Ed Beal Aug 12 at 18:14

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