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I have a refrigerator stored in my garage. It can only be on one wall. The receptacle is on an adjacent wall. Maybe 15 feet away. The fridge tag lists 4.5 amps 115V source and single phase. Garage/Den breaker switch is a 15 amp. The dedicated kitchen refrigerator/GFI breaker switch is 20 amp. My first thought is to use a 10 or 12 gauge extension cord. Would this be OK? My second thought is to run surface mounted EMT conduit and a metal receptacle box to the wall by the fridge. Any thoughts on these two options?

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  • Is the existing receptacle surface-mounted or flush-mounted? – ThreePhaseEel Aug 8 '20 at 14:36
  • Its a standard wall flush mount. I just found out there is a garage heater on a dedicated circuit. Breaker switch to garage heater is a dual 30 amp. Piping is coming from nreaker box to above work table to a on/off switch box. Not flushed. Pipe then goes from on/off box up to heater near ceiling. Maybe I can remove on/off switchbox to heater and replace it with power receptacle box. I would still need to use an ext cord. Or run the pipe to refrigerator wall, so I dont need an ext cord. – Don Noll Aug 9 '20 at 19:53
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To be correct, I'll just about guarantee that using an extension cord would be a violation of the refrigerator instructions, and violating the instructions for a device is a code violation.

Running surface mount EMT is a pretty simple job.

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I'd use a surface raceway for this job

This sort of branch-circuit extension job sounds like something that'd be trivial to do using home-store-special 500-series Wiremold or equivalent surface metallic raceway, with a a few 14AWG THHNs run inside it and a single 15A receptacle at the far end for the garage fridge. You can either have a receptacle (even a GFCI) at the starting point, or simply turn it into a pure junction box instead using a blank cover plate.

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