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I have a GFCI outlet that trips every time it rains hard, always resets right away and rarely trips again with the same rain storm. On that breaker are two upstairs bathrooms and a garage (3 outlets total, w/ 1 GFCI in bath), all inside under roof. Plugged into that circuit is a freezer (GFCI tripped before that was added), a FIOS ONT unit powered via UPS unit and an window unit air conditioner (already eliminated as cause).

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    The layout of the circuit isn't clear to me from your description. A sketch would help. What's the location of the outlet that trips? Are there any GFCI outlets in sequence?
    – isherwood
    Commented Aug 6, 2020 at 13:35
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    Are you sure the devices are upstream? All those connections on 1 circuit sounds like some diy work. Or a old home. Is the GFCI tripping cutting power if so they are down stream of the GFCI and that is how they work. That it resets would concern me as to why it tripped in the first place.
    – Ed Beal
    Commented Aug 6, 2020 at 14:26
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    Is there anything attached to the LOAD terminals of the GFCI in question? Commented Aug 6, 2020 at 15:03
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    "one GFCI outlet, 2 non-GFCI, trips and kill all three on circuit." Does this mean that the 1 GFCI trips and the other 2 outlets go dead, or does the breaker trip? Can you provide a sketch showing the outlets (indicate the GFCI) and the order in which they're wired from the panel? (Edit your post and upload a picture by hitting the "sun & mountain" icon.)
    – FreeMan
    Commented Aug 6, 2020 at 16:17
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    I have seen AFCI’s trip a adjacent breaker but not a GFCI I am not saying it can’t happen but the circuitry is fairly simple the hot and neutral currents are monitored an imbalance is what causes a trip if you trip the GFCI what turns off?
    – Ed Beal
    Commented Aug 6, 2020 at 21:08

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A GFCI can only monitor the current passing through it. Anything that happens on its Load terminals or on the outlet itself will be detected. Anything that happens on the Line side will not. If you need to protect things further upstream, you need a GFCI further upstream, perhaps even in the breaker.

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