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So I have a typical oven toaster and based on my research, one of the heating element is defective (no continuity).
My oven has 4 heating elements and only 1 is defective.
2 elements are in the upper area and 2 are in the lower area of the oven.

I don't want to buy a replacement heating element since it's hard to find and expensive (it's cheaper to buy a new oven toaster nowadays)

I am trying to find a way to bypass this defective heating element and make the other 3 elements heat up.

If I put the defective element in the upper area, both elements in the upper area won't heat up.
If I put the defective element in the lower area, both elements in the lower area won't heat up.

Is there a way to make the 3 elements heat up without replacing the 4th and defective heating element?
I'm hoping to bypass the 4th and defective element.
BTW, I put the defective in the lower area, far side

Please see pictures for more details.
Thanks for your help.

Front side view of ovenLeft side view of ovenRight side view of oven

  • The "3d new generation" toaster oven appears often on domains within the Phillipines (.ph TLD) . The company still exists and is making products though I could not specifically locate this model nor replacement parts. Is there a model number printed somewhere on the device? – Freiheit Aug 5 '20 at 20:55
  • One hack-solution might be to rewire it so that one top and bottom element are in series. This would allow you to use half your oven. However it would be fiddly and somewhat risky. Not recommended. – Criggie Aug 6 '20 at 0:45
  • To freiheit, its CK-17. I also tried looking for that in their page but this already is an obsolete model. – edit12 Aug 6 '20 at 23:19
  • To criggie. I did a few rewiring experiment but its still either only one side (up or down) that is heating up. I think i may be doing something wrong. – edit12 Aug 6 '20 at 23:23
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Your heating elements are wired in series because it takes two elements to match the voltage of your electricity supply.

because they are in series the dead element has disabled its partner. There's no cheap solution.

  • Thanks Jasen..... I was suspecting that but could not find the answer in the web..... Thank you for confirming and thanks for a clear answer..... It helped me and hope it can help other newbies and DIYers – edit12 Aug 5 '20 at 11:41
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    I'm thinking the two are wired in series to match the desired current. If you ran a wire to jump the bad element, you'd double the current in that loop. Yes, no cheap, safe solution. +1 – JACK Aug 5 '20 at 13:27
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    You might have some luck finding another similar model toaster, possibly even one which is broken in some other way, and just rip one of the heating elements out of that. Easier than simply buying a whole new toaster? Of course not, but more fun if you want a project... – Darrel Hoffman Aug 5 '20 at 17:50
  • similar size might be good enough if can measure the resistance of the elements – Jasen Aug 6 '20 at 0:56
  • @JACK You'd double both the current through the element and the voltage across the element, quadrupling the power it outputs. That's almost certainly going to be fairly spectacular for but a short period of time. – David Schwartz Aug 6 '20 at 4:00

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