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I haven't mowed for many months due to special circumstances so my yard's grass was pretty dense. Several time the motor stopped after grass formed a compact bulk completely blocking the blade. After the third time this happened, my Flymo Easimo Electric Wheeled Lawn Mower(Amazon link) doesn't start any more.

What is the likely cause and can I do something about it? I really don't feel like buying another one right now.

EDIT: There was no smell when opening the bonnet, and no disconnected wire or anything like that. Also I used the lowest setting (meaning the one to cut the grass as short as possible)

EDIT #2: I just tried again and the mower now works! Yet for 5 minutes trying an hour ago, nothing.

  • Was there any sort of burning smell when the mower stopped? Have you tried removing any of the plastic work to see if there are any loose/opened connections or any indication of melted wiring or other damage to the motor itself? If so, post pics of the damage. – FreeMan Jul 17 at 15:33
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    When cutting very high grass it is prudent to set the mower on the highest level, and even cut half strips by overlapping the courses. Then in a few days mow again at the desired level. – Jim Stewart Jul 17 at 15:44
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    If no smell then you may have blown a safety fuse somewhere in the machine. Consult the owners manual. However, if you check/replace the fuse, and it still won't start, then the motor is likely burned out. "When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth." ~Sir Arthur Conan Doyle – Jim Fell Jul 17 at 16:28
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    Thank you all for your useful input! @isherwood the mower now works! I tried for 5 minutes an hour ago to no avail, I suppose thermal overload protection is the right explanation. – drake035 Jul 17 at 16:57
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    Yes, probably thermal protection. And adding emphasis to what others have said here...when mowing tall grass, you want to mow it as tall as possible, otherwise it "shocks" the grass and it will have a harder time recovering. Taking a smaller bite (1/2 row at a time is easier on the mower. I assume you're not bagging, if correct, be sure to blow the clippings over the cut grass, not over the uncut grass to further minimize the load on the mower. – George Anderson Jul 17 at 17:03
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You may have tripped a thermal overload protection and just need to let things cool down, or there may be a manual reset. Batteries and electric motors are fairly dense structures and may take a while to cool down. Place the mower in a breezy location or put a fan on it to speed the process.

Obviously to prevent this you'd want to reduce the load on the machine. Take narrower swaths or raise the deck, and move slowly.

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I've cut through meter-high grasses and other stuff with a plain lawnmower. The trick is, you need to go very, very, very slowly. And listen closely to the machine, it will make detectable noises when it is starting to overload and you must detect and respond swiftly to stop that.

Also, this is a time you'll want those blades super sharp. So if you have the means, keep em bright!

It's gonna take an age, compared to what you're used to. You won't like that. But don't think about how miserable the job is today, think of the dozen times this year you didn't have to do it. It's a huge net savings, so you should be happy.

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$18 dollar solution: swing blade

source

enter image description here

I have been having lots of fun with my new swing blade this summer. You can take the blade off and sharpen it up super sharp. It goes thru grass and weeds like they were nothing. If you hit one of the rocks that make the lot unsafe for the mower it will kick up sparks! Sparks show up better if you go out in the dead of night, when it is cool. With this you will not wake up your neighbors doing your lawn in the dead of night.

Wear gloves, starting when you sharpen it.

You can plow thru all that tall grass with your swing blade and then use Buzzy the Electric Mower to keep it short.

Or maybe stick to the swing blade.

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  • This doesn't answer the question, which is about getting an electric mower to work again. – isherwood Jul 17 at 19:15
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    @isherwood: /can I do something about it? /. No constraints given on what that action might be. – Willk Jul 17 at 20:18
  • Interesting tool, unfortunately they don't sell anything like that here in the UK! – drake035 Jul 18 at 9:57
  • @drake035 - in the UK you can get a proper scythe. – Willk Aug 18 at 20:35

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