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I removed and cleaned the flush valve, because the toilet was running (i.e. leaking water into the bowl). After reinserting it, the water now leaks onto the floor (but not into the bowl anymore). I screwed back the valve using hand force only as hard as I could.

Questions:

  1. Is there some typical mistake that could explain this? (I'm very beginner in this matter.)

  2. Before filling the tank again, is there an easy way to check if it will leak or not? (I'm thinking of a kind of trick like putting a tire tube into water to find where the hole is.)

Here is a schematic drawing of what the valve looks like:

Basically the valve has a "stand", with threads on the outside, which screws into a counterpart, with threads in the inside. On the threaded part of the stand there is a gasket as well (which I swear I did not forget to put on :D). Something like this.


     +--------------------------------------------------------------------------+
     |                                                                          |   <-- tank
     |                                                                          |
     |                                                                          |
     |                                                                          |
     |                                                                          |
     |                                                                          |
     |                                                                          |
     |                                                                          |
     |                                                                          |
     |                                                                          |
     |                      \___________________/ <-- threaded "stand"          |
     |                        ________________ <----gasket                      |
     +--------------------------+           +-----------------------------------+ 
                                =============
                                =============  <--- tube threaded inside
                                =============


1

I always put a thin layer of silicone sealant on both sides of the gasket and have not had leaks, but nothing is guaranteed.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for the tip. Just to make sure I understand: is this similar to what you use? Do you first place it on the sides of the gasket, and then put the gasket in? Or do you place it on the adjacent surfaces? (Does that matter at all?) Are there any caveats (beyond both surfaces being dry)? – Attilio Jun 8 at 16:01
  • 1
    In putting it on the seal or the sides It doesn’t matter. dry is best so bubbles won’t form in the seal. Any silicone sealant I usually have a squeeze tube of tub and tile in white it works great and you don’t use much , I think that tube is still good that I have and it is almost 3 years old. Some last less than a year before turning into a brick in the tube, in some cases not even opened. – Ed Beal Jun 8 at 18:13
  • One more question (also inspired by this): how much more difficult does the silicon make the process of unscrewing the parts later, even after months or years? Doesn't it form some kind of very resistant "glue" which holds everything together? Is there an easy way to remove it? – Attilio Jun 9 at 7:56
  • To tell the truth on slick surfaces like plastic and porcelain it peals off with rough surfaces it is much tougher I use a razor blade and it is easily shaved off. – Ed Beal Jun 9 at 13:18
  • Also, how much time do you let it dry before filling the tank again? Hours? Days? – Attilio Jun 10 at 7:17

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