0

This may be a trivial question but I can not find an example online specific to my situation. I have heard you end at cabinets, end at countertop, add bullnode at very end of wall, etc. Here is the wall I am trying to add subway tile to:

enter image description here

enter image description here

As you can see there are some oddities. The switch at the top will not be fully covered by the tile so a tiny part of the top will be uncovered, the countertop ends very close to the end of the wall, etc. Any suggestions about where to start the backsplash or any picture examples would be greatly appreciated!

4
  • 1
    This looks like the end of a pass-through countertop, that ends on a wall with a walk-through area on the other side of the wall. I would not call that a backsplash. What you are installing is a wall tile for decorative purposes. I would start at the countertop and go halfway between the two switch for the top edge. The front edge could end either at the countertop edge or go out to the molding. It's really how you want it to look and the look pleases you. Also depends on the tile you are installing. – Programmer66 May 24 '20 at 19:08
  • 1
    Do you have to tile? I don't see a sink nearby, which implies that you don't need water protection. – Aloysius Defenestrate May 24 '20 at 19:14
  • 2
    This is one of those "there is no right or wrong" answer. What you're doing is purely for aesthetics, so it really comes down to what you (or your SO) is happy with. – SteveSh May 24 '20 at 19:25
  • 1
    I agree with @AloysiusDefenestrate, it looks very nice as it is and any attempt to tile it will look strange. – Jimmy Fix-it May 24 '20 at 20:11
0

Not what you're asking about, but important:

If you regularly plug in more than 2 devices, as implied by the 6-1 gadget in the picture, then I highly recommend putting in another dual 15A receptacle a few inches away from the existing one. It can be on the same circuit and on the load side of the existing GFCI. I would put it a few inches away (either above the existing receptacles or to the left, below the light switches - presumably there is a stud between the switches and the receptacles) rather than putting in a 2-gang box because many devices need extra room (e.g., wall warts). It can share the same circuit so the cost is basically standard dual 15A receptacle + box + a little bit of cable and appropriate clamps, etc. This solves two problems:

  • For now and the future it eliminates the extra plug-in gadget to "expand" the receptacles. I use those, but I hate them. When there is a specific need - e.g., provide surge protection, then they make sense. But when they are just to add more receptacles they become another point of failure.

  • Doing this now, before you tile, means you don't have to do extra work patching. If you do a half-way decent job, any mess (extra holes, scratches, etc.) will be totally covered up by the tile! Very convenient.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.