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I recently purchased a mobile home and have changed out the vanities in the bathrooms.

In the master the drain line was to low and had to extending the sink drain to hit that line, which was easy. But now the second bath the drain line is HIGHER than the P-trap.

Hopefully not busting into the wall to drop that line.

How do I fix this ?

enter image description here

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Thanks in advance for any help.

3 Answers 3

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As long as your sink is above the drain it will work. Looking at your photo I would shorten the drain line from the wall. Make you get everything sealed or it will leak but it will work because the drain is below the sink bottom.

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  • I guess the picture didn't show just how slightly above the drain line is. But basically the top of the drain line is above the actually sink. So there is still the collar to tighten the drain to the sink, plus the drain plug for the sink it's self that is below the drain line. I can shorten both the drain line and right below the drain plug hole below the sink, but the drain line will still be higher than the sink. Should it still work?
    – Darrick
    May 13, 2020 at 11:31
  • Looking at the basin the Drain line is well below that With some of your plumbing being lower it will make a larger trap at worst it might slow the drain but it will work.
    – Ed Beal
    May 13, 2020 at 13:02
  • Maybe I'm missing something, but the drain line is definitely ABOVE the basin.
    – Darrick
    May 13, 2020 at 13:19
  • There may be one heck of a paralyx in the photo but the drain /stopper assembly is the bottom 2 inches or more. The basin water level is above the stopper assembly.
    – Ed Beal
    May 13, 2020 at 13:37
  • yay, sorry, I'm no plumber. all I know is that the p-trap is below the pipe that goes into the wall.
    – Darrick
    May 13, 2020 at 13:39
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The whole point of a P-trap or S-trap is to have some standing water so you don't get sewer gas coming into the building. There is no required maximum depth of the trap, but if it gets too tall, you may get waste standing and rotting in the trap. Since this is a bathroom sink, not kitchen, that shouldn't be an issue for you. The weight of water sitting in the bowl will push the water in the trap up the bit of pipe until it's in the horizontal run and running down hill on its own again. If the bowl was below that drain line then you'd need a pump or to relocate the drain.

You could shorten the line coming in from the wall (as suggested in another answer). You can also shorten the tail piece coming off the bottom of the sink.

Purchase your trap (if you haven't already) and fiddle around with it until you get everything to fit, adjusting pipe lengths as necessary. Just remember "I cut it 3 times and it's still to long" is far better than "I cut it once and now it's too short".

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    There is a maximum depth. The water depth in the trap isn't supposed to be more than 4".
    – isherwood
    May 12, 2020 at 20:15
  • Thanks, @isherwood, I figured there probably was and that somebody would know. Actually, eyeballing it, OPs trap may exceed that height, but I did recommend shorting the tail piece.
    – FreeMan
    May 13, 2020 at 11:04
  • As I stated above, the drain line is actually above the actual bottom of the sink. I do have my pee trap and just don't see how shortening the drain line, that fix's the fact that the drain line is above the tail piece? There is the drain plug hole below the threads, so the shortest I could make it is still ~ 2 inches below the sink. Will that still work?
    – Darrick
    May 13, 2020 at 11:35
  • @Darrick I'm not 100% certain, but I believe that you'll be OK. The bottom of the drain line is below the bottom of the sink bowl. As water drains, that horizontal line should empty. Since water will seek to be level, the water will drain out of the bowl and down the tail piece until the top of the water is sitting just below the bottom of the horizontal line. Thus, you won't see water in the bowl and will consider the sink "empty". The drain close mechanism will likely end up sitting in water, but it's mostly plastic, so that won't effect it's function or life span...
    – FreeMan
    May 13, 2020 at 12:11
  • ...you may want to wait for a plumber to chime in for an "official" comment and to see if that meets code or not, but in terms of physics, I'd say you'll be OK with it.
    – FreeMan
    May 13, 2020 at 12:11
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Get a different tailpiece, the part that connects to the underside of the sink, one without the 'drain plug hole'. This will allow you to slide the trap up tighter to the underside of the sink (right up against the nut).

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