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My house built 1970, is built on 6X6 piers. The four Piers along the back of the house are okay but the next row of four piers are slightly settled lower and the front three piers are considerably lower by at least six inches from the back of the home. The grade on the property slopes as well in the same direction. And one side of the front of the home is lower on the left then it is on the right. Each pier is concreted into the ground and has two unmilled 2x10’s bolted to each side of the piers, which the floor joists are set on. The 2x10’s run from back of house to the front. How can I level the home so I can renovate the interior of the home? The floor noticeably slopes inside the house as well.

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Depends what you have to work with, pier/post wise.

Also depends how much "fix" you want given that the foundation is moving, unless it was just poorly built at the start.

If you have enough extra post above where the rough 2x10's are bolted in, you support, unbolt, level (slowly....) then drill and rebolt.

If not, you can do the same, but lower all to match the lowest one, trimming off the post tops if they don't have room to move up.

Alternatively, you could probably "sister" the piers/posts so that you could raise the 2x10's

If you actually want to address the inadequate footings, you have to support the house, then remove and rebuild the footings and piers. Which is quite a bit more work...

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  • Thanks. I was kinda thinking the right way to do it was to lift the house evenly, and replace the piers. It was kinda of a poorly built house unfortunately.
    – Augie Holm
    Commented May 3, 2020 at 16:16
  • If you have space, consider moving it (having it moved) a short distance onto a new foundation (or posts/piers) that can be built without the hassle of having a house sitting over them when they are built. It may cost out better...
    – Ecnerwal
    Commented May 4, 2020 at 0:55

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