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I am working on a project to provide networking data to a food production line. All of the power (both 120 & 220 volts is run in a chase approx. 15' long and the chase is roughly 8"s tall and 6"s wide. Instead of having my networking Keystone Jacks cut into a sheetrock ceiling tile above the production line I am wondering if I can run 4 CAT-6 SHIELDED network cable in the same chase that contains the 120 & 220 Romex and just cut in my keystone jacks with stainless steel wall plates on both sides of the food production line in the proper places I need to to be able to connect 4 video controllers to the store network?

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Nope! class 2 (low voltage) wiring cannot be in the same raceway as line voltage.

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  • George, thanks for the quick response. What if I put the shielded CAT 6 inside of a grey 1/2" PVC conduit then put that inside the raceway with the high voltage to seperate them better? Would that work: – John Apr 22 at 17:05
  • That I'm not sure of. Maybe one of the "big 3" could answer that. One other consideration in putting low voltage cable in close proximity to line voltage is induced current, interference. One of my rules is to keep LV cables at least 12" from line voltage cables (if running in parallel with each other) and if they need to cross, cross them at a 90 degree angle. – George Anderson Apr 22 at 17:12
  • Pretty sure you would need boxes as well as the conduit to get away with that - and even then, check with your local inspector first, rather than having to do it over if their take on this is different than mine. Personally and professionally, I'd be up in the ceiling tiles, and I'd run conduit down the wall from there if the jacks needed to be lower. – Ecnerwal Apr 22 at 18:29
  • Great feedback. I truly appreciate all of your help. :) – John Apr 23 at 21:05
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There are suppliers of CAT 5 Ethernet cable (not sure about CAT 6) that is rated for 600V and is "PLTC" listed. PLTC means Power Limited Tray Cable and with that listing, it can be run in the same raceway as any other cable up to and including 600V. It is not going to be the cheap cable you can get at a hardware store, it is "industrial grade" stuff that you will have to buy from an industrial distributor that specializes in control system networking. Allen Bradley makes and sell it for sure, there may be others.

There are other 600V rated Ethernet cables available, but most of them are listed as "AWM" (Appliance Wiring Material). The difference is, AWM requires it's own raceway but can enter and terminate in an enclosure with other power circuits up to 600V, it just cannot be RUN with them in a raceway.

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    The problem with that, though, is that all parts of the wiring must be done in the same manner as mains voltage, not just the part that's actually in the same raceway. So you would need to find rated CAT5 keystone jacks, patch cables, and equipment as well. – PhilippNagel Apr 22 at 19:04
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    PhilippNagel is correct. This answer suffers confirmation bias: you expect this ought to be allowed, so you do a brief search for anything that supports that it might, and then stop without rounding out the research. Just as Philipp says, that is for the rare case when the entire low voltage circuit, end to end, is contained within Class I wiring methods, e.g. SCADA. It can't come out to a coax/ethernet port and then go to a computer/TV, because that outlet, cord and computer are not inside a Class I wiring method. – Harper - Reinstate Monica Apr 22 at 20:29

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