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I have a warped vinyl tile that does not lay flat on the floor underneath. There is not water damage, there is no other apparent problem. What solutions can you suggest?

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Maybe I can use a glue to glue this back to the floor underneath?

This is a more close up view

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Thanks

P.S. There is no water damage. The solution should be simple. I don't think I'm the only person for whom this has happened.

  • You'd have to tell us something about the flooring. Is it self-adhesive, or is there existing glue on the underlayment? What's underneath? – isherwood Apr 20 at 15:01
  • @isherwood Added the photo of what's underneath the tile – Jenia Ivanov Apr 20 at 15:19
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    I don't think it is vinyl. looks like regular MDF core to me.... – Jack Apr 20 at 16:47
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    The only way to fix properly, what caused it,that is, is to remove the flooring, fix the underlying issue, and replace the flooring. I just figured, if the floor went back down easy enough, and could be held in place with weight, it could be bonded to the neighboring piece. If it cannot be easily pushed back down... That's the main criteria, the flooring will need to be removed, to solve the issue why it cannot be pushed back down easily. For example, if it did get wet from below that does not show any symptom on top. The only way to fix that is to replace the piece. – Jack Apr 20 at 18:40
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    I think Jack is providing an example of one thing that would cause MDF to expand. Water was my first thought also because other than the look we can’t tell the type of flooring, being two tight and large temp swings ? Hard to tell from this side of a computer. – Ed Beal Apr 21 at 13:45
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If the piece can be pushed back down easily enough and held there with a little weight like a flower pot or similar, use clear water based caulk to inject into the gap as much as possible. Get it in as deep as possible along the length of the gap. A fine cut tip will aid in doing so. Fill the gap, and when it is pressed down the excess will push out and around the groove a little that is broken off that you don't see. After the weight is added to hold everything down, clean up the excess and let it set for 2 or more days while the caulk dries INSIDE the space. Air will not get to it easily for it to dry rapidly, so patience is needed here.

4/30 edit

Polyseamseal(R) Is my choice for the job. It is water based, rated as an adhesive and comes in clear. It is available in small tubes so you can use the applicator if you like.

The adhesive will ooze out, you want it to. You also want it to go in as far and wide as possible too.That is why the clear caulk. Some will be left in the groove between the planks. The idea is to have a bucket or sink close by to rinse the sponge out frequently. Squeezing out as much water as possible so water does not puddle while cleaning. The caulk will go down white and dry clear. Do not let the sponge be so wet it will wash out the caulk you are trying to clean up. That is why squeezing it out as much as possible and cleaning frequently. Change the rinse water and clean again. Make sure all caulk is off the surface only. The white line between the pieces will dry clear and it won't be seen in time, a few hours. To affirm a prior comment, make sure the weight you use will hold the plank down. With the caulk everywhere before cleanup, it is the only chance to see the gap tight until the caulk is cleaned up

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    If the plank lifted up due to it getting wet and swelling the base layer of the plank, you will not be able to "fix" it with a water based glue, it might actually make it worse. A Contact Cement would be better, but that is ASSUMING that this is not a "floating" floor, meaning the planks are not actually supposed to adhere to the flooring, they are laid over a foam pad that is used to dampen the sound and provide some cushioning. Trying to glue down one raised plank may not work at all and might make a mess. You might want to call a flooring contractor to see what you have. – JRaef Apr 20 at 18:22
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    This is not a floating floor? You are certain it is glued? if it is, it really would not affect the answer. The glue used to bond this material to the floor comes in a bucket and troweled on. It would be difficult to place it where it needs to go without it having a tip to place it inside the gap. Other issues with using the original glue with the info that I have is, even a bigger mess to clean up, if it is water based adhesive, at least that would be manageable. getting in place IS the issue. Cost too. The caulk I have used will hold very well. It is a high grade painters caulk. Continued. – Jack Apr 21 at 0:25
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    If the original adhesive is solvent based, boy, you will really have a mes to clean up... – Jack Apr 21 at 0:26
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    You will have a mess to clean up in either case, One being different than the other in what is used for cleaning. Water for the caulk. Paint thinner for the PL. For the PL glue, the Loctite version is what I go by, but have plenty of paper towels and paint thinner handy, Do not get too much thinner everywhere, it will readily run into the joint and weaken the bond. If you must use PL, make sure you put enough in the joint to work around the tongue of the flooring a bit. That's why the mess, it will ooze out a lot, just to get a little in. – Jack Apr 21 at 1:25
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    To help with the cleanup glue mess issue, try the woodworking tip of using masking tape or transparent packaging tape along the edge. Any glue squeezed out will be on the tape. When the glue has dried, just pull up the tape. – Programmer66 Apr 30 at 18:39
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Ans OP question in comment.

Updated to change the glue to be used.

1. to help with the glue mess, place transparent packaging tape along both edges. Tape as close to the edge as possible.

2. You may have to insert a couple of thin wedges, screwdriver, etc. in the gap to get enough clearance to get the glue in

3. use a glue wedge tip or screwdriver to push the glue in the gap and underneath the plank

  1. I would use Gorilla Glue Clear, which is waterproof and glue most surfaces. This is only a small area.
  2. After inserting the glue into the gap, wipe off any excess.
  3. lay a layer of wax paper over the repair area. this is to prevent the glue from sticking to the heavy weights that you will place on top of the gap to push it down even to the floor.
  4. Place heavy weights on the gap and wait for the glue to dry.

If your scotch tape can hold it down, then this should work. See what comments are posted on the use of Gorilla Glue Clear as the glue for this solutions.

Caution: Make sure it is Gorilla Glue Clear, other Gorilla products may be the forming type, which you do NOT want to use.

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    Yes - gorilla glue is similar to the Titebond product, You can use the tip on either one, but you will still need to use a flat blade screwdriver or similar tool to push the glue underneath the board. Note that Titebond III is waterproof. The other product is a caulk (sealent) and is not a high performance glue. – Programmer66 Apr 30 at 19:31

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