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Goal: Understanding the NEC code language for practical DIY application.

All occurrences of the phrase "no other outlets" related to a house (not an RV) in the NEC 2017 are:

210.11 Branch Circuits Required.

...(C) Dwelling Units.

...(1) Small-Appliance Branch Circuits. In addition to the number of branch circuits required by other parts of this section, two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuits shall be provided for all receptacle outlets specified by 210.52(B).

...(2) Laundry Branch Circuits. In addition to the number of branch circuits required by other parts of this section, at least one additional 20-ampere branch circuit shall be provided to supply the laundry receptacle outlet(s) required by 210.52(F). This circuit shall have no other outlets.

...(3) Bathroom Branch Circuits. In addition to the number of branch circuits required by other parts of this section, at least one 120-volt, 20-ampere branch circuit shall be provided to supply the bathroom(s) receptacle outlet(s). Such circuits shall have no other outlets.

...(4) Garage Branch Circuits. In addition to the number of branch circuits required by other parts of this section, at least one 120-volt, 20-ampere branch circuit shall be installed to supply receptacle outlets in attached garages and in detached garages with electric power. This circuit shall have no other outlets.

210.52 Dwelling Unit Receptacle Outlets. This section provides requirements for 125-volt, 15- and 20-ampere receptacle outlets. [...]

...(A) General Provisions. In every kitchen, family room, dining room, living room, parlor, library, den, sunroom, bedroom, recreation room, or similar room or area of dwelling units, receptacle outlets shall be installed in accordance with the general provisions specified in 210.52(A)(1) through (A)(4) [about spacing etc].

...(B) Small Appliances.

...(1) Receptacle Outlets Served. In the kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling unit, the two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuits required by 210.11(C)(1) shall serve all wall and floor receptacle outlets covered by 210.52(A), all countertop outlets covered by 210.52(C), and receptacle outlets for refrigeration equipment.

...(2) No Other Outlets. The two or more small-appliance branch circuits specified in 210.52(B)(1) shall have no other outlets.

625.40 Electric Vehicle Branch Circuit. Each outlet installed for the purpose of charging electric vehicles shall be supplied by an individual branch circuit. Each circuit shall have no other outlets.


These texts confuse me: 210.52(B)(2) applies to the branch circuits of 210.52(B)(1). In turn, 210.52(B)(1) initially includes (something like) only food-related areas, but then extends to receptacle outlets covered by 210.52(A), which includes almost the whole house including the mentioned food areas except, roughly, the pantry and breakfast room.


Questions:

  1. Why is it written like this? What is the intent?
  2. To which spaces/areas does the "No Other Outlet" of 210.52(B)(2) requirement apply?

Example dilemma:

Let's take a new bedroom:

Interpretation 1: This bedroom, INcluding all of its wall receptacle outlets, is covered in 210.52(A). Hence, 210.52(B)(1), by referring to 210.52(A), does require all bedroom wall receptacles to be served by one or more "20A small appliance branch circuits". So no other outlets are allowed.

Interpretation 2: This bedroom, EXcluding all of its wall receptacle outlets, is covered in 210.52(A) (so just the abstract room space; its receptacle outlets are not explicitly mentioned). Hence, 210.52(B)(1), by referring to 210.52(A), does not require all bedroom wall receptacles to be served by one or more "20A small appliance branch circuits". So other outlets are allowed.

Which interpretation is correct?


Related posts:

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210.52(A) defines a scope of dwelling units

Consider a well-developed outdoor barbecue area. It has a BBQ, a double sink, some countertops, maybe some other outdoor-rated appliances, etc.

Consider an office "break room" area with a reasonably competent kitchenette.

Consider a commercial restaurant's waitress alcove/island area, where salads are made, coffee is brewed, soups are doled out, etc.

All of these are out-of-scope for 210.52(A). What Code is saying is that 210.52(B) does not apply in these locations; it only applies where 210.52(A) applies, i.e. inside dwelling units.


No Other Outlets is being overloaded to have 2 meanings at once.

You have to carefully read the context.

"No other outlets" as applicable to the mandatory circuit.

Take a garage. You have a grandfathered garage with a 15A receptacle, opener and light circuit. You develop the garage attic into an ADU, which voids the grandfathering and now the garage must be brought up to 2017 Code. That requires one garage circuit, and and that one garage circuit may have no other outlets (i.e. they must all be in the garage). However, Code is silent on existence of any other garage circuits. Those may exist and may serve other outlets. So the 15A circuit can stay, and provide supplemental service beyond the mandatory.

"No other outlets" as applicable to every receptacle.

Take a kitchen. Say you already have a 15A kitchen recep circuit that serves there, and outdoor outlet and a hallway outlet. You must have at least two 20A kitchen recep circuits. What about the 15A? Nope, 210.52(B)(1) says "shall serve all wall and floor receptacle outlets". That means every wall and floor recep outlet must be on one of those covered 20A circuits, which due to (B)(2) must be dedicated. So that means the 15A circuit must stop supplying kitchen receps. It cannot be an optional third circuit.

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  • That seems correct. But what about the bedroom example dilemma I added to the original post? (too many characters to add here as comment). – Johan van Ravenhorst Apr 12 at 0:07
  • Thanks, a great explaination. How about all the dedicated circuit from a the panel to the dish washer, microwave, compactor, ice machine, range hood,etc.? These are dedicated home run circuit, with no other outlets, branch on the circuit. All appliance are 1500 watts or less. Would these need to be 20A also? – Programmer66 Apr 12 at 17:45

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