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I want to buy a commercial Countertop Merchandiser/Freezer for home use.

Model at this link. Maxx-cold.com

Does my home in the US meet the Volt/Watts requirement to use it?

The electricity requirement is 115/60Hz/1 Ph (NEMA 5-15).

Why 115 volts, because 120 volts is standard in the US.

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That's fine, they are nominally the same. 120v is utility supply defined by ANSI C84.1. 115v is point of use desired voltage, generally specified by NEMA. One is 120v +5/-10% tolerance, the other is 115V +/-10%.

NEMA 5-15 is a standard receptacle used throughout a US home.

This document says the cabinet draws 2.0 amps, should easily be used on any nearly any circuit.

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It should operate just fine but your home insurer may not approve. There's a nice summary of potential issues at this site. The case in point is a coffee maker but the concerns would be the same: the certifications for commercial use are different than from home use, not simply "stricter" but different.

Best idea is to send a description of the device to your insurer, making sure to note all the certifications it will come with, and see what they say. Keep their response on file and if you ever change insurers, make sure the new ones know about this device.

The very worst case, that it will somehow actually harm you or your family, may be very unlikely. The second worst case is that your insurer will deny a claim if they find that such a thing was present, even if it's unrelated to the event in question; and that may be actually quite likely.

Oh, and the manufacturer may not honour their warranty if the device is used in an environment other than what was intended.

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  • What they're talking about may or may not be true for the OP's appliance -- it depends on the specific UL standards things are listed under – ThreePhaseEel Apr 1 at 0:16

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