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I have a new solid-wood interior door that I want to hang. I removed the previous jamb, as it was not well installed. The rough opening is reasonably plumb when looking through the doorway (some shimming will make the jamb perfectly plumb in that direction). However, the wall in which the doorway sits is not plumb. It is about an inch out of plumb from the floor to top of the door.

How do I account for this and hang the door plumb to the floor?

I am stuck with the out of plumb wall and cannot adjust it by tapping the base with a sledge because it is a finished home and has drywall already hung.

All that makes sense to me is to install the jamb out of plumb (aligned with the wall). Then, install the door stop (stop block - not sure what best to call the piece that stops the door) and the hinges plumb. This will mean the stop block is 1 3/8" in from the edge of the jamb (as is typically the case) at the bottom of the door, but it will be 2 3/8" in at the top of the jamb. And in that case, the bottom hinge can be set fairly easily (aligned with stop block, not with edge of jamb). However, the top hinge would need to be set the same distance from the stop block, which means it would be set so far into the jamb at the top that the pin itself would no longer be proud of the jamb's edge. Is that okay? I could gouge out the jamb just enough to make room for the hinge pin...but is that a terrible idea?

Better ideas?

Edit: I feel perhaps I posted this question too quickly without fully thinking it through. Another possibility (that now seems an obvious solution) would be to install the jamb nice and plumb, though it will extend beyond the wall at the bottom. Then use drywall compound to bring the wall out to flush with the jamb.

  • Is one side of the rough opening any better than the other, or are both walls out of plumb the same amount? Also, how wide will the trim be you are using? Will they be mitered at the top corners? – Jack Mar 7 at 3:42
  • use parliament hinges. – Jasen Mar 7 at 3:44
  • The wall leans the same on both sides of the rough opening. Picture standing 5 feet away, looking through the door. What you see in front of you (the rough opening) is reasonably square and plumb. However, the wall itself is tipped away from you, such that the top of the rough opening is an inch farther away from you than the bottom – susie derkins Mar 7 at 3:45
  • Depending the style of trim and width, will help determine how much fudging can be done. Usually, depending on the trim choice and whether it is mitered or not, 1/2" can be taken away by moving the jamb past the wall at the top and the bottom to aid in getting it closer to plumb and carve away the drywall strategically to help ease the trim to meet the wall properly. – Jack Mar 7 at 3:53
  • What you mention in your edit is worth another idea. Since you are willing to feather it out to be plumb, or at least more plumb, you could remove enough drywall to allow shims to be added or sister studs to the existing to get the wall plumb. Perhaps it could be done on the other side of the wall as well? It will require a wider jamb, but it will be plumb... – Jack Mar 7 at 4:17
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Depending the style of trim and width, will help determine how much fudging can be done. Usually, depending on the trim choice and whether it is mitered or not, 1/2" can be taken away by moving the jamb past the wall at the top and the bottom to aid in getting it closer to plumb and carve away the drywall strategically to help ease the trim to meet the wall properly.

What you mention in your edit is worth another idea. Since you are willing to feather it out to be plumb, or at least more plumb, you could remove enough drywall to allow shims to be added or sister studs to the existing to get the wall plumb. Perhaps it could be done on the other side of the wall as well? It will require a wider jamb, but it will be plumb...

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