1

I bought this valve which I believe is 1/2" IPS:

enter image description here

And I have shower hose that according to Home Depot compatibility board is "1/4 brass pipe" (or "3/8 brass pipe" with the adapter I have).

enter image description here

What adapter do I need to connect that hose to the valve? I guess I am confused how "brass pipe" standard is being called outside Home Depot.

6
  • 1
    Unless I'm misunderstanding your question just take the adaptor and hose into HD and they'll fix you right up. Admittedly, it can be tough to find someone in that department - but that's the easiest.
    – HoneyDo
    Feb 16, 2020 at 0:24
  • @HoneyDo I asked for help but the employee gave the "It looks like we don't carry these" answer. So I would like to order from Amazon, but I am not sure what exactly I need to buy.
    – user389238
    Feb 16, 2020 at 0:31
  • Why use that type of thermostatic valve for a shower? Grohe and others do thermostatic showers that are designed with an on/off as well as temperature cotrol...
    – Solar Mike
    Feb 16, 2020 at 5:57
  • @SolarMike It is for salon spa sink and was the most reasonable price as on egress water I put a cheap $10 one way valve. The other thermostatic valves I could find are either wall mount or expensive.
    – user389238
    Feb 16, 2020 at 6:36
  • Is IPS threading compatible with NPT threading? - no.... 3/8" IPS male to 3/8" NPT male, to, 3/8" female to 1/2" NPT female, to, 1/2" NPT male to 1/2" IPS female. ... Or get just get an 1/2" IPS line. But I'm not sure if burying IPS inside a wall is code compliant, which would be why this thing has no means of fastening and is cheap af.
    – Mazura
    Mar 18, 2020 at 18:23

1 Answer 1

1

There are countless plumbing adapters made for the seemingly infinite number of combinations a person might want to connect. It's nice when we can find a single fitting that does exactly what was needed, but a home center like Home Depot carries a relatively small selection of adapters. A person can almost always make a given connection by using a combination of two or more in-stock parts. It is not viewed as wrong, improper, nor unprofessional to use a combination of whatever is available to get the job done.

It would be great if you could find a reducing coupling -- that's a part which is female threaded on both sides, but one side is threaded smaller than the other. Sometimes called a bell reducer.

If you can't find a reducer of the right size then try for a reducer where at least the large side fits (ie 1/2 IPS to fit your valve). Failing that, get an ordinary coupler. In both cases you can use a bushing to reduce the final size to match the thread of your hose.

I can't quite tell, but it looks as if the hose has a female connection. I have on occasion seen male-to-male adapters of different sizes. You might be able to find one of these that fits your hose and steps up to, or closer to, the 1/2 target size (and then finish the connection with a coupler). If not then just use a regular nipple if needed.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.