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My potable water pipe is half in throughout. The booster pump I would like to install is 1 inch. Can I add two reducers to accommodate this pump and would this cause any problems as such?

Firstly my issue is very low water pressure to my residence.The municipality delivers the potable water via half inch copper and the rest of the pipe throughout the house Is also half inch.I am contemplating installing a BOOSTER PUMP (not as yet purchased) which has 1 inch inlet and outlet openings.The question is can install a reducer on both the inlet and outlet of the pump to connect the existing half inch which I currently have in the home to the 1 inch NTP threaded inlet and outlets on the pump?Do you see any issues arising from this connection I.E use of the reducers?

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  • Booster pump is 1 inch suction & discharge – Clyde Jan 26 '20 at 22:51
  • I'm having a lot of difficulty understanding your situation and question. It might help if you clearly explained the current setup, what problem you are having. A photo might help too. – jwh20 Jan 26 '20 at 23:20
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    Firstly my issue is very low water pressure to my residence.The municipality delivers the potable water via half inch copper and the rest of the pipe throughout the house Is also half inch.I am contemplating installing a BOOSTER PUMP (not as yet purchased) which has 1 inch inlet and outlet openings.The question is can install a reducer on both the inlet and outlet of the pump to connect the existing half inch which I currently have in the home to the 1 inch NTP threaded inlet and outlets on the pump?Do you see any issues arising from this connection I.E use of the reducers? – Clyde Jan 27 '20 at 0:13
  • Please edit the question rather than posting as a comment. – jwh20 Jan 27 '20 at 0:53
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You can reduce the output size with few problems except limiting the flow, pushing into a pressure tank will be better on the pump unless a variable frequency drive is used. Limiting the input can cause severe cavitation and damage the impeller and housing in a short period of time.

Normally a smaller size pump will cost less and have smaller ports, even using a 1/2” pump may have issues if your draw is larger than the supply this can cause a neighbors faucet when opened to suck air in.

In my area for systems that can not provide enough water we usually install a large tank like 500 gallons and put the booster on the out put of that tank, a simple float valve at the top of the tank stops the incoming water when the tank is full just like a toilet tank valve. I was thinking of a ball on a lever not a modern fluid master.

Size the tank based on several hours or daily water usage.

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