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I'm attempting to install a new kitchen faucet, but I'm having trouble removing my old faucet. Based on the attached pictures, is it obvious what I'm supposed to unscrew?

Also, is it a concern that it looks really ugly up there?

enter image description here

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    Loosen the single inner small nut, that should relieve tension on the outer "bell" housing. Its a "Moen" then, but totally funny way to spell it, especially because it describes the feeling you have right now have to change it out! ;) – noybman Jan 14 '20 at 3:29
  • Then the question is, how do I go get that nut? The thing it's attached around sticks down maybe 2 inches, so I can't use any of the tools I have laying around. And the casing around it means I only have maybe 1 inch around it to work with. – dfitzgerald Jan 14 '20 at 4:40
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    Big Box stores, and I'm sure little ones too, sell wrenches made for this. They are like deep well sockets.... homedepot.com/p/Husky-Shower-Valve-Socket-Set-16PL0132/… – noybman Jan 14 '20 at 6:10
  • PS: that faucet probably came with a "cheap" one that did the trick then got lost. – noybman Jan 14 '20 at 6:10
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    @dfitzgerald, the area is gross looking because water was draining down from the top around the faucet. Make sure the new faucet is sealed to the sink with plumbers putty or a rubber gasket. – JPhi1618 Jan 14 '20 at 15:13
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While the picture sure makes it look bad, chances are the sink is ok. You won't know for sure until you get the faucet off, but once you do, just make sure the metal is still solid. It should be. If the rust doesn't clean up, and the basin has seen better days it might give you some joy to put a new sink basin in. Anywhoo....

Loosen the single inner small nut, that should relieve tension on the outer "bell" housing.

That's about it.

To get into the bell housing:

By the way, the name brand is "Moen" - but its a totally funny way to spell it, especially because it describes the feeling you have right now having to change it out.

Once you get it off, clean it up good, make sure you have plumbers putty, or a good gasket that comes with the new one. Keeping moisture out is what will keep the metal from looking like that in the future. Look for high quality faucets with decent warranties (some even carry "lifetime" on most parts), they cost a bit more, but it pays for itself.

Also keep any tools it comes with for future use.

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