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I have purchased a new property and the property has flooring which I think is wood. the floor has a scratch which can be seen in the link below. It's hard to describe the scratch but it's like a really thin top layer of the surface has been peeled away, almost like when skin is grazed on tarmac

enter image description here

How I would I go about fixing this and more importantly how do I identify the type of flooring. Thanks

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Why do you want to identify the type of flooring? It looks like solid wood flooring. Are you looking to identify install type (floating, nail, glue down), wood species?

For a scratch like that I'd be tempted to just spot sand and try to buff a finish in that blends with the existing. In order to do that well you'd probably want to try sanding a board in a spot that isn't visible and practice to find a finish that matches and blends well.

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  • I guess the only reason I need to identify the floor is so I know how to fix it properly without ruining it. However, if the same strategy applies to all types of wooden floors then maybe it’s not so important – saj Jan 10 at 21:33
  • Same strategy applies – Fresh Codemonger Jan 10 at 22:03
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You have two choices:

  1. Sand down and refinish the entire room
    • Can be costly. DIY tends to produce terrible results
  2. Remove, replace, and finish just the affected planks
    • If you choose this then you can more easily identify the wood once it is removed
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To me, it looks more like solid wood planks. As mentioned previously, your choices are basically to sand it down and have it fully restored, which in my experience is expensive, or completely replace the flooring which might actually be cheaper. Might be a better idea to choose new flooring, maybe go with lookalike wood flooring that's a bit more hard wearing? Laminate flooring is a lot cheaper? We used laminate in the hallway when we bought our Edwardian terrace three years ago. We've got thisand it's not marked badly at all?! Let us know what you do?

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