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I wanna start by saying I'm learning I'm by no means an electrician. with that said I would.like to know if I hooked this gfci to switch up correctly for a garbage disposal. the garbage disposal is to be plugged into the gfci and ran by the switch. I ran a new line to the gfci and hooked that up then ran splice wire from white and connected white from switch and Same for the hot and grounded all to green nut in back of box

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  • Does the garbage disposal work? If you press the Test button on the outlet....does the disposal stop working? – Steve Wellens Jan 9 '20 at 5:36
  • You said it all too fast and blurry to understand what you did. There are details about how GFCIs work that are important. For instance it has LINE and LOAD sides. The hot to the GD switch, and the neutral back from the GD, need to both go on LINE, or both go on LOAD. Not one and one. – Harper - Reinstate Monica Jan 9 '20 at 7:02
  • all my wired go.to the line side – MinionHandyman Jan 9 '20 at 12:36
  • Can you post photos of the wiring please? – ThreePhaseEel Jan 9 '20 at 12:47
  • yes i will post photos when I get to the house. I apologize for being an idiot – MinionHandyman Jan 10 '20 at 1:32
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I do not think you did it correctly but I will explain.

Connecting the GFCI without a switch all sounded good. But you then put the switch on the white or neutral if I understood your question.

The proper wiring would be the “splice” to the switch if a piece of Romex is on the hot to the outlet , you remove the black line feeding the outlet connect that to the white of the Romex and mark that white at both ends with tape or a sharpie. That reidentified white connects to the switch, then the black in the Romex “splice” connects to the other side of the switch and at the outlet on the hot / line side.

I think you switched the neutral side this is a code violation. We re-identify the white and have it always hot so someone later doesn’t mistake it for a neutral. But that is the proper code compliant wiring for a switch leg. (+ grounds and while the breaker is off but you know that).

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    I agree with this . When you mark the white wire, mark it in black.+ – JACK Jan 9 '20 at 16:04
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    Yes any color other than green, white or gray is legal but most use black. – Ed Beal Jan 9 '20 at 19:36
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I can't quite make out what you wrote but it sounds wrong to me.

Here's what you should have done:

  • On the GFCI, connect the black, white and green/bare wires as follows: black to LOAD line, white to LOAD neutral and green/bare to the ground coming in; this can be pigtailed with the ground to the GFCI. Don't touch the LINE terminals!
  • At the switch, connect the black wire from the GFCI to one switch terminal. Connect the black to the disposal to the other switch terminal (so that the switch interrupts the hot). Connect together both whites (from the GFCI and to the disposal) using a wirenut (or equivalent connector). Connect together the green/bare from the GFCI, the green/bare to the disposal, the ground terminal of the switch and the box (if metal) using a wirenut or equivalent. You may need a pigtail to the switch terminal.
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    dont touch the lines side seriously? I as told not.to touch load unless I was putting in another outlet with it? – MinionHandyman Jan 9 '20 at 12:37
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    He's plugging the disposal into the GFCI so he should use the line terminals on the GFCI. The load terminals would only be used for downstream outlets/GFCI protection. – JACK Jan 9 '20 at 13:13
  • @JACK My impression was that he was going from a GFCI, presumably above the counter, to the switch and then to a plain outlet for the disposal. I certainly wouldn't put the GFCI below the counter so that when it trips, I'd have to crawl under to reset it. In any case, the original question is so poorly worded that I can't tell for sure. – DoxyLover Jan 9 '20 at 22:02

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