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enter image description hereenter image description hereenter image description hereI’m confusing about line2 from wall has 4 wires instead of 3? Line 1 and Line3 has only 3 wires. Line 2 is not 3-ways switch. What I know is only 3-way switch has 4 wires. My question is how do I connect to smart touch panel switch? That switch is different than regular switch. It combines all the live wires and go into L. Neutral wires go into L1, L2 and L3. I don’t know what to do the red wire from Line 2. Please help me solve my issue.

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Thank you all for suggestion. I decided not to use it. Is there any switch out there I can turn on and off by remote control or something? because that switch is behind something, it’s very hard to reach. That why I bought this item which I can use by remote control.

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I bought the smart switchs. I’m going to use instead of previous one. But I’m facing another issue. Those smart switch has 4 wires including red wire. I’m going to install 3 smart switches for 3 lights. I tested the line wires. Only one of the line wire (black)from middle circuit has power. The other 2 have no power. Also only middle circuit has red wire. The other 2 have no red wire. How do I connect?

I bought the smart switchs. I’m going to use instead of previous one. But I’m facing another issue. Those smart switch has 4 wires including red wire. I’m going to install 3 smart switches for 3 lights. I tested the line wires. Only one of the line wire (black)from middle circuit has power. The other 2 have no power. Also only middle circuit has red wire. The other 2 have no red wire. How do I connect?

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    This thing is dangerous, cheap junk. entirely unfit for installation in mains power. Safety standards were ignored, and they didn't bother applying for UL listing since they would never pass. Note the fake "CE" mark, which means nothing on a Chinese product shipped to North America. Anyway, it's illegal to install this (NEC 110.2) and your fire insurance won't pay. – Harper - Reinstate Monica Dec 26 '19 at 16:05
  • Mechanically speaking, I'm not sure if this thing will fit on a North American box, since it lacks the yokes that North American wiring devices use (it appears to be designed to fit a UK/Euro-style back-box instead)...is trashing this and getting something listed for US service an option? – ThreePhaseEel Dec 26 '19 at 16:09
  • Thank you for the command. I didn’t know that. I just noticed that it has no ground terminal. I bought it from eBay. If it’s unfit or illegal in US, eBay should not allow them to sell, – john chang Dec 27 '19 at 2:33
  • @johnchang -- eBay can't reasonably make that determination in a generic fashion, though... – ThreePhaseEel Dec 27 '19 at 3:06
  • @johnchang -- also: what sort of remote are you wanting to use to control these lights? – ThreePhaseEel Dec 27 '19 at 3:09
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Be VERY Careful What You Install

With plugged in items, if there is a problem it is usually quite obvious and, very importantly, very easy to resolve quickly - just unplug it.

With hardwired items, including smart switches, timers, touch switches (like this one), motion sensors, etc., if there are problems they may manifest themselves by simply dying (annoying but no big deal) but occasionally a little more dramatically, like burning your house down or killing you.

You should always make sure that hardwired mains-voltage (120 or 240) items are appropriately UL Listed or similar. There are other labs that provide real-world useful certification. CE is not one of them - it is just a mark that anyone can print. Fortunately, actual fraudulent UL Listing marks are much more unusual, though it would be nice if there was an end-user easy & reliable way to double-check UL Listing - if there is, I don't know about it.

In addition, the Chinglish wording (I count 5 problems in a quick read) and a number of other design "features" point to this being a cheap and non-certified device that is very risky to install in your house. It is possible that the internals were designed by a good engineer and manufactured to acceptable tolerances. It is also possible that any or all of the following could be present:

  • Insufficient insulation or design such that the "touch" part of things is designed in a way that could result in current going through the user in a wet environment.
  • Components incapable of handing a full load (800W per section, 2000W total) - which may be OK when used with a smaller load (e.g., 50W per section of LED lighting). In fact, I think that is extremely likely as the typical incandescent max. load is 600W per section and a 15A device (the usual design) is typically limited to 1440W by code. 2000W as a maximum would almost certainly not pass even the most basic certification for a consumer light control in the US.

and I could think of more things if I took the time. But just don't do it. If you ever have a problem, your insurance company will take one look at it and determine that it was not installed according to code and likely refuse to pay. You can't argue "but residential straight switch replacements by the homeowner are OK" because while in most areas that is OK, it is premised upon the materials and workmanship being up to code. In this case, the materials would definitely not be up to code.

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    Thank you for your explanation. I got a lot of knowledge from you. – john chang Dec 27 '19 at 2:50
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You will need to verify this with a voltage tester but my guess is that LB2 is your hot, line, in and R is your switched hot to that light. So connect all grounds together and to the switch. Connect NW1, NW2 and NW3 together (they already appear to be connected). Connect BL2 to the L terminal on the switch. Then connect LB1, red & LB3 to L1, L2 & L3 on the switch, those are the loads for the switches.

OK. I followed site rules and just answered your question. Now there are safety concerns from three very smart individuals directed toward this switch. You would be very smart to listen to them.

If you decide to go back to three regular toggle switches, connect grounds together and pigtail them to the switches. Keep the NW1,2 & 3 connected together. Pigtail LB2, if it is indeed hot, to the three toggle switches to make them hot. Connect LB1, red & LB3 to the remaining terminals on the switches.

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  • Thank you very much. I decided not to use it. Anyway, my last question is Line 1 and Line 3 has only 3 wires but Line 2 has 4 wires. Why? Line 2 is not 3-way switch. – john chang Dec 27 '19 at 2:48
  • @johnchang Line 1 and Line 3 come from the fixtures the switches control so they'd have a black, white and ground wire only. Line 2 comes from a fixture too but the feed from the breaker is at that fixture too. so we need the fourth wire to bring the feed to the switch box so you can feed all three switches. – JACK Dec 27 '19 at 2:59
  • If you don’t mind, will you please draw the picture? – john chang Dec 28 '19 at 2:21
  • @johnchang What do these switches control? – JACK Dec 28 '19 at 3:29
  • You said keep NW1,2,3 together but smart switch needs Neutral wire. I tried to cut the NW pigtail and connect all neutral individual. Then I connect all line wires together including from smart switches. But it didn’t work. What should I do? – john chang Jan 5 '20 at 14:39

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