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I need to joint this drywall with another. My experience in the past was bad when applying joint compound to this type of joint, paper on drywall edge was too hard to bury in the mud. When I spread mud with knife, it sticks out.

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    The photo leads to a lot of questions. Until it is clear what your trying to do, it isn't easy to respond. Why isn't there backing behind the end of the drywall sheet? Are you wrapping drywall around a framed corner? Questions aside, taping drywall involves techniques better learned by watching than reading written responses. Youtube has a gazillion videos on the topic. Why not use that resource? – Charles Dec 20 '19 at 23:59
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    I would like to see a photo from several feet back. If this a sheet and more is needed to the left there are ways to fix this but if it is a door or window other methods could be used but it looks like a total DIY that is not quite right. – Ed Beal Dec 21 '19 at 2:29
  • Posted another pic. I am planning to use furring strip to joint new dry wall piece with existing drywall on right. If there is not enough space to screw through new drywall piece and furring strip, I will have to cut drywall more like an inch. – user2716454 Dec 21 '19 at 12:13
  • How to do butt seems? With a 12" trowel that's slightly bent so that it leaves a swath of mud in the middle about 8" wide, after you've applied the tape with a 6" taping knife, and then have gone over it once with a regular 12" above and below the seem to build-up up to 24" of fill. – Mazura Dec 21 '19 at 22:45
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When doing a straight butt joint with two cut edges, I'd always go over the seam with a four sided sanding sponge to smooth and chamfer the edges a bit, then apply mud and then tape over the seam .... and more mud with 6" knife and finish with 12" knife. Definitely watch Youtube as @Charles suggested.

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    I agree with a wide knife but a sanding sponge, I don’t have that much time, even on my own home , razor knife to bevel, tApe and a big wide mud knife to feather it in. – Ed Beal Dec 21 '19 at 2:25
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    @EdBeal The sanding sponges are pretty stiff. The corner in the seam and a few swipes and both sides of the seam are done.. In my next life I'll try the razor knife on your recommendation. – JACK Dec 21 '19 at 3:28
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    I did up vote but the sanding sponge ? I thought we were talking about butt joints not corners , sanding corners with a sponge is quick. – Ed Beal Dec 21 '19 at 3:38
  • @EdBeal I was unclear. The corner of the sanding sponge in the seam of the butt joint. – JACK Dec 21 '19 at 3:44
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you need a rasp. Expect to create some dust, but you can make the "trough" if you're careful; take your time. The "trough" should be about 1/16 to 1/8" deep by about 2" on the end.

The new piece you put on - select a factory beveled edge. They should mate up perfectly! Then you can put paper on (you need it based on this picture) and feather it out, it should be at least 8" on both sides.

Drywall is more of an art than a science, patience and visualization will get you there - and good pressure, which pushes the water and gypsum into the surfaces.

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    The Sheetrock is in place , a rasp can help to make a bevel to hide a but joint but a razor knife is faster. I would just use wide trim. – Ed Beal Dec 21 '19 at 2:23

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