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I need a hinge, that as part of its turning motion also moves 'up'*. It's like a casement hinge, except that unfortunately casement hinges only go until 90º, while I need a hinge that can bend at least 120º. I haven't been able to find anything else, so I'm posting here. Is there any type of hinge that moves up while bending?

Thank you.

*When I say up, I mean that the hinge moves in a direction in the same plane as the rotation. I'm sorry for not making that clear.

  • Are you thinking of a hinge along the top edge of an object, so that the swing arc is a vertical plane rather than a horizontal plane? It sounds like maybe you want a hinge with a long arm..? That would let you position the pivot point further from the moving leaf, and as a result, the leaf would move away from the fixed portion. – Greg Hill Nov 26 '19 at 15:30
  • @GregHill, I was thinking of a hinge, mounted vertically that rotates in plane with the board it's mounted on. And as it rotates the object it's rotating moves up or down that plane. – Rafael Nov 27 '19 at 1:49
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Yes, they are called “rising butt hinges”.

The “joint” is at an angle and as they rotate it gives vertical movement.

Here is a link to one such product: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Rising-Butt-Door-Hinges-Stainless/dp/B00GK5QLY8

  • I'm so sorry! I meant that the hinge moves in the same plane as the rotation. See my edit. – Rafael Nov 26 '19 at 12:09
  • I don't know what they're called but I've seen these often used on kitchen doors at restaurants and stockroom doors at retail stores. I found some once at a local farm supply store with 180 degree swing, in and out. (The farm store's unfortunately out of business so I can't ask them about the hinges.) – Eric Simpson Nov 27 '19 at 14:19
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Well I found them. This egress casement hinge fit the bill perfectly. After poking around for long enough I discovered an "egress" casement window hinge (egress means for windows that can be used as exits in emergencies). While the hinge in the picture on the website is open to a bare 90º, I bit the bullet anyways because the track gave it more space to turn. After receiving them, I can personally attest that they open far more than 90º, probably closer to 150º. It would appear that they just used a track for a non-egress window (one that needs more space to open) leaving the egress hinge with plenty of extra space to turn. And they didn't put a stop in it too!.

Hinges

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