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I am wanting to change the older style Australian 3 gang light switch with a new ‘Smart’ wifi 3 gang switch.

I just need some help in getting the wiring in the right place. I have included pictures of the old and new switches.

Any help would appreciated.

Existing switch and wiring enter image description here

New switch enter image description here

  • Hello, and welcome to Home Improvement. Interesting question; let's see if you get a good answer. And, you should probably take our tour so you'll know how best to participate here. – Daniel Griscom Nov 19 '19 at 1:32
  • Can you post a photo looking into the back of the box please? – ThreePhaseEel Nov 19 '19 at 1:46
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    you're going to need a neutral connection to make that smart switch work. look in the back of the box for a black wire. – Jasen Nov 19 '19 at 6:52
  • From what I see it looks like the box only has switch loops, so you're going to need to run a neutral from the nearest light fitting to the switch box. (that will be the black wire on the light fitting) what's above the ceiling? – Jasen Nov 19 '19 at 6:59
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Unfortunately, your switch is wired using the '3 plate' or 'switch loop' method, so you don't have a neutral available at the switch.

You will need to either get a switch that doesn't require a neutral, or run a new cable to the light that the feed comes from - the two core cable.

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The way the 3 gang switch (3 way) has been wired in the picture above is not the correct way to do it as in this configuration, which is "Power to the light", you should have a seperate cable with two wires for each switch.

The Common terminal "C" being the being the permanent live wire and the one terminal "1" being the switched live wire.

In regards to wiring the Wifi switch you can't do it with this as only the "Active" wires, the permanent live and the switched live, go to the switches for this switch to work you need a neutral and an earth wire.

http://lrd.kangan.edu.au/electrotech/toolbox1204/resources/04diagrams/04lighting/05loops.htm

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  • That is perfectly legal practice, if uncommon. There is no requirement for C & 1 to be used in that order, and supply and switched lines being in different cables is acceptable - why else would SDI (single-core double insulated) cable exist? – SomeoneSomewhereSupportsMonica 2 days ago
  • The problem here is that the one wire on the first switch ,that is shared across the common terminals, is carrying the load of three lights when all the switches are turned on. This is not the way you want to do it and it makes no sense as you have to pull a cable through anyway why not just use 2 core wire cable for each switch in the first place? You use the C terminal as permanent live as it is not switched only the 1 & 2 terminals are switched on Australian switches. – t123 yesterday
  • They're all on the same circuit, so it doesn't matter if all the load is down one cable - it's all down one cable if you use a conventional power-to-the-switch method, and it's all down one cable where it leaves the breaker. Four cores to the switch is less copper than six. As for C/1/2, you fundamentally misunderstand how a switch works. – SomeoneSomewhereSupportsMonica yesterday
  • Have you not yet worked out that the voltage drop is still better than doing it the conventional way of power to the switch first (as the neutrals do not have to go via the switch box), and that it's the same as using a 3C cable with one feed and two switch lines? – SomeoneSomewhereSupportsMonica yesterday

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