0

So I made an armoire and want to fix it to the wall. But the wall is in the old house and it is tilt a bit, not forming an angle of 90 degrees. So if I just fix armoire to the wall it will not be horizontal and I don't want that.

Is there some standard procedure how to approach this problem?

I was thinking of simply taking some old wood of appropriate thickness, put it behind the armoire in appropriate place and then fix the armoire through that wood to the wall. For some reason I was hoping there is some better way of doing it, is there?

In addition, this will leave a hole looking from the side of the armoire. I thought of putting some moulding to cover it up, any other ideas?

bumped to the homepage by Community yesterday

This question has answers that may be good or bad; the system has marked it active so that they can be reviewed.

  • What is the biggest gap and is it at the top or bottom? – UnhandledExcepSean Oct 18 at 15:57
  • Hello, and welcome to Home Improvement. Would you add a picture of the problem to your post? And, you should probably take our tour so you'll know how best to participate here. – Daniel Griscom Oct 18 at 16:48
0

The product you are looking for is a furniture anchor strap. By attaching it near the top of the piece of furniture and to an appropriate anchor point on the wall it will keep everything upright.

Image courtesy Home Depot:

Furniture straps attached to something tall, like a wardrobe

It will leave a hole behind where the strap anchor is screwed. That can be filled in with wood filler and painted or stained to match the original wood.

  • This doesn't fix the piece to the wall so much as acts as a safety catch. I suspect that the OP want's more stability. – isherwood Oct 18 at 17:44
  • 2
    @isherwood Ah, I had just assumed OP was looking to affix it for safety reasons, but I see your read now. I'll leave this up in case OP is just looking for a safety catch, but I suspect you are correct. – Thegs Oct 18 at 17:50
0

Your plan is fine (and exactly what I'd do). Most furniture has a small gap behind it anyway, so it shouldn't look bad.

The only other alternatives that won't look odd would be to actually shape the cabinet to fit the wall--the side panels and top would need to extend back at an angle. Trying to conceal the gap with trim boards might just draw attention to the matter.

If you wanted to, you could wrap the entire back perimeter with coordinating trim in whatever manner suits the style of the piece.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.