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I am a hvac tech, but my question is I have 2awg stranded and my plug is 6awg, will it matter much if I cut some strands to fit my plug? the plug is 60amp 250vac for a piece of kitchen equipment if the matters.

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    If the connected equipment doesn't require more tan 60 amps, it is not particularly dangerous, but it is poor workmanship. – Charles Cowie Sep 15 '19 at 14:09
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because a question about proper installation of equipment is not a question about electrical engineering theory and design. – Charles Cowie Sep 15 '19 at 14:17
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    Dan, I am guessing that because you are hvac and this is for a kitchen, then this is personal work as opposed to professional. Given it's a kitchen item (oven/stove?) at 60 A, I assume the distance doesn't justify 2awg. Is that what was used from the breaker panel?? In any case, I'd use a splicer/reducer and tie in 6awg to the 2awg without damaging either. Put those reducers into a small box. – jonk Sep 15 '19 at 15:16
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    You should NEVER reduce a wire diameter by removing strands. You have no way to guarantee that all the strands are connected end to end anyway. This is why you should use pressure ferrules on the ends of high capacity wires to ensure all strands are connected. – Jack Creasey Sep 15 '19 at 15:57
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    @manassehkatz Thank goodness there are some sensible folks out there that try to conform to the rules. Cutting strands is just plain stupid apart from being against the rules. – Jack Creasey Sep 15 '19 at 19:09
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AWG 2 reduced by 50% or increased in resistance by 200% becomes AWG 5 so AWG 6 plugs can tolerate a reduction in strands of 50% easily.

The power dissipated per foot of AWG 6 @ 0.32 mOhm/ft at 60 A = 1.2W/ft for internal wires which would barely make the wire warm and the AWG2 even less W/ft.

The connector screw contact resistance will be greater than the few mm reduction length/diameter in strands or 5.4 uohms/inch increase in resistance/pair, so I do not see any issues here.

Use a crimp lug or ferrule for termination.

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    Very bad answer. You have no idea which strands work if you cannot guarantee ALL strands on the other end are bonded together. You should NEVER EVER reduce the strands on power cables. – Jack Creasey Sep 15 '19 at 17:52
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    The individual strands in a bunch are only lightly connected at best….they may or may not be connected together due to the surface oxidation of the copper strands. If you have multicore cables you should either solder the ends or use a compression ferrule to ensure all the wires are bonded together. That fact that you so casually say this would be ok, shows you have no experience with high current circuits. What makes you think the individual strands are connected together? – Jack Creasey Sep 15 '19 at 18:00
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    No it is NOT adequate. The OP claims to be an HVAC tech …...and should know the rules. It's not worth discussing further, but IMO you are completely wrong to provide any form of validation to reducing the number of strands in a cable in ANY application. – Jack Creasey Sep 15 '19 at 18:43
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    I reiterate....you cannot guarantee that all the strands are connected end to end. It's as simple as that. The ONLY way to guarantee a multi strand cable is correctly terminated is soldered or compression ferule. If you cut off a strand on one end you don't care if it's connected at the other. But if the strands you have left are not connected (bonded) at the other end you are reducing your wire size much more than you thought. It's just common sense. – Jack Creasey Sep 15 '19 at 18:53
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    This answer was migrated to diy.se, where engineering matters defer to the Electrical Code. As such, here, it's a very, very, very bad answer. The electrical code says "iksnay, there are cheap and practical ways to do that thing if you need to". And that is that. If a factory wire chokedown were designed by an EE and run through the UL approval process, different deal. – Harper - Reinstate Monica Sep 15 '19 at 19:13