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enter image description hereI have a baseboard heater in my bathroom. It doesn't have a thermostat on the heater itself and there isn't one on the wall either. When I want heat I have to turn on the breaker feeding that heater. The problem is, the heater gets warm but not warm enough. After half an hour I can put my hand on the baseboard heater and it isn't hot at all. It's warm. Since there isn't a thermostat anywhere, what would be determining the temperature of this heater? And can it be adjusted somehow?

  • Do you have baseboard heaters anywhere else in the house? – JACK Sep 12 at 17:39
  • No I don't, only in the bathroom – Blair Sep 12 at 17:44
  • Have you tried removing the end caps to see if there are any dials or wires that could be hooked up to a thermostat? Is this an apartment or a house? – JACK Sep 12 at 17:57
  • Some units have internal thermostats it would be rare to not have one on the unit or on the wall somewhere. – Ed Beal Sep 12 at 18:00
  • Yes I have removed the cover and end caps. There aren't any dials anywhere. This is a house I have recently purchased. I've had other people also say that there must be a thermostat somewhere. I've invited them in to search and they all leave scratching their heads. – Blair Sep 12 at 18:03
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It may be a vestige of a larger whole house baseboard heating system, where there was a central t-stat somewhere and all of the baseboard heaters were controlled from that one point. If that system was replaced with a central forced air heating system at some point and just this one room still has the baseboard heater (i.e. because there was no duct run to it), that baseboard may still be connected to a central t-stat somewhere that is buried or hidden. So it gets satisfied by your central heating system and shuts off, killing your sole remaining baseboard. The reason I know this is that I had that exact situation in a house in Seattle, where baseboard heating was the norm back when electricity was almost free. I put in central forced air gas heating, but had no ducts going to a seldom used basement room, so I left the baseboard there to be used only when the room was used. I didn't realize that the t-stat in the wall in the basement stairwell, which I thought was abandoned, was still active and controlling that baseboard heater.

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This is not a thermostat problem. If the baseboard unit is not getting hot, then either it's designed to run at a low temperature or the electric line feeding it has a limiter somewhere. A thermostat merely makes or breaks the connection to the heater until the room temperature reaches the setpoint.

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