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Light fixture is out is identical to the above photo, a hanging halogen light fixture. The previous owner told us to rotate the fixture by about 20 degrees and it should lower. I rotated the fixture but it didn't work - I'm worried that I damaged the fixture as it's now sitting slightly lower than before.

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I doubt that you damaged the fixture. You probably loosened it from the electrical box it's attached to. Usually the bulbs can be changed without removing the fixture from the wall. Turn the light off (because it gets very hot) and try to push up the fixture and rotate it in the opposite direction to correct what you did before. Get a ladder, not a chair, and get up there close so you can see what's going on up there and where the bulbs are.

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    Thank you - the handyman in the building helped me change the bulb (with ladder). The glass and metal frame is attached to the fixture on a spring loaded hinge. He popped the spring and the fixture opened up. Our medium term plan is to switch out all the halogen lamps with LED. :D – KT12 Aug 24 at 17:07
  • I have always disliked halogen bulbs. They burn so very hot. glad you got this fixed. – JACK Aug 24 at 17:25
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    The LED bulbs should not be so hot as a halogen. Halogens had the best color of light, to me, but LEDs are getting closer all of the time. Halogens tended to have short lifespans too. – Old Uncle Ho Aug 24 at 17:38
  • @olduncleho the technical term for halogen color is 3000k. They are pretty close to 100 CRI. If you want 3000k 90CRI LEDs, just buy them, they are available mail order, and even in shops if you get lucky. – Harper - Reinstate Monica Aug 25 at 0:36
  • The 3000K refers to the Kelvin absolute temperature index. 3000 specifically is the (usually average) color of light radiating from (usually) a theoretical “black body” (usually iron) measured at that temperature Kelvin. I understood halogens to come close to the sun in terms of not only general color, but also being a point light source. The CRI is usually relative to how typical human vision sees in sunlight. <- time to Google-slap me? – Old Uncle Ho Aug 26 at 20:09

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