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I have a new induction cooktop Bosch PIF645BB1E rated at 7.4 kW. According to its documentation it should be connected with 5 wires (2 phases, 2 neutrals and 1 PE wire). From a former flat renter I have a power outlet with 5 dedicated 2.5 mm2 wires (3 phases, 1 neutral wire and 1 PE wire). I think that I can connect 2 phases to 2 phases, PE wire to PE wire and 2 neutrals to just 1 neutral wire, but I am not sure that just one 2.5 mm2 neutral wire is enough in this case. Is it OK to connect it like this or I need thicker wires for this cooktop?

Thank you for your answers!

Edit: Sorry, I forgot to mention that I live in Germany and voltage is 230/400 V. Also I attached photos of back side of the cooktop with connection diagrams and photo of my power outlet. power outlet

power outlet

  • What country is this in? – Jim Stewart Jul 17 at 22:44
  • Yeah, where are you on this planet? Also, I take it this cooktop runs on 230V? – ThreePhaseEel Jul 17 at 22:45
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    Shoot us a photo of your service panel. There's a very important question of whether your house's service is 1-phase or 3-phase. The answer to your neutral question depends on it. – Harper Jul 18 at 1:05
  • Docs here – Harper Jul 18 at 1:10
  • Just a comment as a real answer depends on your house service details. But pretty clear from the docs (thank you Harper) that the cooktop can be installed with 2 hots/2 neutrals, 2 hots/shared neutral or even shared hots/shared neutral - all in figure 6 on page 3 and figures 10 & 11 on page 4. In the US, 2 hots/shared neutral is normal for cooktop installation. – manassehkatz Jul 18 at 2:09
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What you've described is the correct way to do this.

As the currents in the two phase wires are fed from different phases, they do not add together fully, and so the neutral will not be overloaded.

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