3

I had a rotten floor joist on the ground floor , i fixed it by sistering a brand new floor joist right beside it in the basement But when i wanted to instal the beam , i had to cut the wire running through the old joist in order to place the new joist beside the old one Now the wire is too too short ,about 4 inches distance between the tips of the cut wires. And unfortunately no slack in the wire . I thought about using two junction boxes to extend the wires in the ceiling . Is there any better way to do this?? If not, once i put the junction boxes, can I use the cover plate on them and keep it behind a REMOVABLE drywall( i mean a drywall panel that has exposed screws that can easily be removed to expose the junction boxes in the ceiling. Appreciate any thoughts Thanks

3
  • What gauge and type of cable is involved here, and where are you on this planet? Jul 11 '19 at 2:42
  • The wire gauge is 14 solid grounded. I am in Montreal Canada thanks for your quick response
    – Mehrad m
    Jul 11 '19 at 3:01
  • 1
    What's on the circuits? I have a circuit in the ceiling of my basement where the wires needed to be cut for a structural repair as you're describing. The circuit was for lighting in the basement and had very little load on it. The prior homeowner solved the problem by installing a ceiling box on each side of the repair and adding additional lighting, which provided convenient boxes from which to extend the wiring versus having blank face plates on the ceiling. The fixtures are in slightly odd places, but I now have lots of light in my basement.
    – dwizum
    Jul 11 '19 at 15:03
5

2 junction boxes is there best approach. But instead of a removable panel, just get blank covers for the boxes and mount the boxes to the drywall. You also don't have to keep the wires in the same place they are now. You could cut more off and put the boxes farther apart, if that makes disguising the boxes easier.

2
  • 2
    What i forgot to mention is that there were two other wires that needed to be cut for the floor joist to go in, and i already put two junction boxes on them . Now with these two extra ones i am going to have 4 exposed covers . So thats why i was trying to eliminate the "junction box cover motif " look .
    – Mehrad m
    Jul 11 '19 at 3:23
  • 5
    That's that point I was trying to make: just because you cut the wires there, doesn't mean that's where you have to put the junction box. You should consider pulling back the wires to somewhere else less obtrusive and install the junction box there.
    – longneck
    Jul 11 '19 at 12:42
2

Drywall screwed in place generally will not count as "accessible". That is both in the strict definition because you need tools to open it up. But also for the very important reason that the next owner might think it is just an unfinished section (e.g., replaced because of water or other damage but never patched/painted) and decide to patch/paint the next time they paint the room. And now it becomes not just inaccessible but hidden.

What you could do is install a plywood (or other material) door with a small handle, like an access panel for an attic or for plumbing. Not quite as smooth as drywall, but if all painted the same color and done well, it may not be that noticeable.

3
  • 1
    Ohh that is a great idea , thanks i will do so with a plywood.but is there any othere way to extend the wire aside from using 2 junction boxes that you can think of
    – Mehrad m
    Jul 11 '19 at 2:50
  • 1
    A solid electrical box cover with two screws is much less visible than a plywood panel, and . . . handles?! These box covers come in white with color coordinated screws but can be painted to match the ceiling. Plywood would be makeshift. Jul 11 '19 at 17:06
  • 1
    @JimStewart I agree - but my sense - as confimed by some other comments - is that OP already has some junction boxes in place and the wires won't reach to simply move the boxes down to the ceiling so more work might be involved to put boxes in the ceiling than to make an access panel for the existing boxes. But in general, box covers painted to match the ceiling would be very inconspicuous. Jul 11 '19 at 17:15
1

A while ago I had to replace a bathroom fan. Of course one the same dimensions was not avialable.

So I went to Habitat for Humanities 'Re-Store' and bought a square kitchen cabinet door. Cut a hole in it to mount the fan, and attached the door to my ceiling with 4 brass screws.

I did a similar trick in my shower to provide ready access to the plumbing from the other side of the shower wall.

You can do the same with doors, or with plaster medallions. Use enough wire that you can make a pattern of the the spots. Paint can make them less obvious or you can make them blatant by making them contrasting colours.

If it won't quite make a pattern, you can add a door or two that don't include a junction box, or include one that is empty.

1
  • 1
    I wanted to say that i really appreciate all of comments and advises. I will use two junction boxes and try to see if i can try to get away by using the simple box covers . I personally think 4 covers will be overwhelming in a 20x45 inch space .but you never know.if i place them and they don't look tolerable and fairly out of sight then i guess i have to make a access panel for it
    – Mehrad m
    Jul 12 '19 at 1:37
0

Evidently some jurisdictions allow these repair splices for non metallic cable repair to be hidden inside walls. I think this is questionable, but you could investigate it as an alternative to ceiling boxes. However it does not appear it would bridge 4 inches.

I assume this cable is copper conductor, probably this repair splice is only approved for copper.

Personally, I would use boxes and metal covers which can be painted to match the ceiling.

3
  • 1
    I would never advise buying anything for mains electrical from Grainger. They also sell a lot of electronic components which are rated RU (Really Useless to us, thanks ThreePhaseEel) and you could buy one of those by mistake. One should purchase mains gear from a proper electrical supply house, because if it isn't legal, they won't stock it. They'll have these. And their prices are way better than Grainger whose business model is be a "one stop shop" for a huge variety of low volume industrial items. Jul 11 '19 at 15:36
  • You'd use two repair splices with a length of NM between them for this, BTW Jul 12 '19 at 2:34
  • What is it about these special repair splices that allows them to be hidden? Are they made of materials that will not age significantly over 50 years? Do the two ends fasten so securely that they cannot be pulled apart accidentally? Jul 12 '19 at 12:20

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.