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I'm trying to fit a slightly larger trash can into an opening in thick (about 1") plywood (see photo). Basically, I need to shave off some material in the corners to make the new can fit.

Question is, what is the right way to do it and what tools should be used? So far, I'm thinking about possibly using a hole saw. Or is there a better way?

photo

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    Don't try the hole-saw idea without screwing a scrap piece of wood for the central drill-bit in the hole-saw to go into. Without that, your hole-saw it likely to just run around all over the place and make a mess of everything. – brhans Jun 9 '19 at 15:23
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    use a half round rasp file .... also, that looks like particle board, not plywood – jsotola Jun 9 '19 at 16:18
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Correct thing to use in this situation is a rasp -- you are just trying to remove a small amount of material and get it to conform to the existing garbage can.

A coarse file would also work, as would a draw knife or spindle shave.

I would avoid saws, as it is hard to cut relatively small amounts of material out using a saw.

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This seems like an application where a saw like the one pictured below would be ideal. If you get the more expensive hollow ground type of blade for it the cut can be nice and smooth.

Jigsaw

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Picture Source

Hollow Ground Jigsaw Blade

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Picture Source

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If you do not have an electric jigsaw and you do not want to invest in one, a perfect (and economical) tool for this job would be what is commonly referred to as a keyhole saw. You will be surprised by how often it comes in handy after you own one:

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You can get something called a "drill saw bit" which is like a drill bit but with extra teeth along the length so you can move the drill sideways and use it like a (very cheap) router or file. I've never tried them but for the small amount you need to remove they could provide an affordable solution.

Drill saw bits

  • A lot of drills have bearings that will not support sideways loads. Not to mention that controlling these things is pretty tough. – gbronner Nov 7 '19 at 3:04

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