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I am installing a new GE electric dryer (model GTD42EASJ2WW) and attempting to connect the 4-wire cord. The last step is to connect the green ground wire with a supplied ground screw. The hole that is annotated with a ground symbol is behind the hot wires and somewhat inaccessible. See photo below (hole in question is pointed to by red arrow):

enter image description here

Rather than connect to the hole that is annotated with a ground symbol, I attached the ground wire via another, much more accessible screw hole (see above). I am wondering whether this is safe. In other words, as long as the grounding wire makes secure contact with the metal back of the dryer, will the dryer be grounded? Or is there potentially something specific about that one hole marked with the ground symbol that requires that I connect the green wire there?

Edit: Additional information. Below is from the installation instructions (available online at https://www.geapplianceparts.com/store/parts/assembly/GTD42EASJ2WW). Note the description of the bracket as "strain relief bracket", which is distinct from the "strain relief." The instructions (step 7) say that the hole for the ground screw is "above the strain relief bracket", which is consistent with where I put the ground screw. The diagram in the installation instructions also appears consistent with where I put the ground wire. The only thing that's inconsistent is the location of the ground symbol.

enter image description here

Second Edit: Taking a closer look, there is another ground symbol hiding behind the terminal of the red wire, just above and to the left of the strain relief bracket. This is more consistent with the diagram in the installation instructions than I had thought, which gives me further confidence that I've connected ground to the correct spot. Thank you everyone!

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    I see a split to the left is that plate separate ? I use the back plane of equipment all the time but if that plate is a separate one attached by the black screw I would want to move the red pull it off if you need to it’s just a disconnect or female spade connector put your ground on then slip the red back on. – Ed Beal Jun 3 at 16:54
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    Is the hole the right size? Was it threaded for that screw? Was the crankdown force excessively light or excessively heavy? – Harper Jun 3 at 16:54
  • What size of screw did you use? – ThreePhaseEel Jun 4 at 0:04
  • @Harper I don't believe that the hole was threaded. The screw fit very tightly and I had the impression that it was digging its own thread (might it be a self-tapping ground screw?). The screw had a notch a the bottom, kind of like this: platt.com/platt-electric-supply/Ground-Screws-Cutting-Point/…. – diy8675309 Jun 4 at 1:09
  • What thread pitch did that screw have? Was it a pitch similar to an ordinary sheet metal screw, or a fine pitch, similar to what you'd find on the screw you linked, or a more typical grounding screw for that matter? – ThreePhaseEel Jun 4 at 1:41
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Taking a closer look, there is another ground symbol hiding behind the terminal of the red wire, just above and to the left of the strain relief bracket (see first photo in the question---the first horizontal line of the ground symbol is just visible above the terminal for the red wire). This is more consistent with the diagram in the installation instructions than I had thought. Between that and the text of step 7 of the installation instructions (which states that the hole for the ground screw is above the strain relief bracket rather than on the strain relief bracket), I feel fairly confident that I've connected ground to the correct spot. Thank you everyone!

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