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Are either of these ok:

a) Two NEMA-5-20 outlets, each has a run of #12 wire, that runs all the way to a single breaker, which then clamps 2 black #12 wires.

b) Two NEMA-14-50 outlets, each has a run of #6 wire, that runs all the way to the breaker which clamps on two red leads and two black leads.

  • What is plugged into the two NEMA 14-50s? – ThreePhaseEel May 13 at 23:04
  • Electric car chargers. – samsmith May 14 at 1:05
  • How far apart are the two NEMA 14-50 outlets? Is replacing the home runs for them an option? – ThreePhaseEel May 14 at 1:24
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    Also, what make/series are the breakers in question? (If you don't know, add a photo to your question and we can help you ID them :) Furthermore, do you have spare spaces in your panel? – ThreePhaseEel May 14 at 1:25
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a) Two NEMA-5-20 outlets, each has a run of #12 wire, that runs all the way to a single breaker, which then clamps 2 black #12 wires.

It depends on the specifications of the breaker. If it allows 2 wires then OK. If not, just connect the two wires to a third wire (pigtail) and connect that wire to the breaker.

b) Two NEMA-14-50 outlets, each has a run of #6 wire, that runs all the way to the breaker which clamps on two red leads and two black leads.

No. See Wire two 14-50 outlets to 50 amp breaker

  • How do I know if the breaker specs allow 2 wires? – samsmith May 14 at 1:04
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    @samsmith -- it will say on the breaker's label what wire sizes and how many wires are allowed in the breaker's lug – ThreePhaseEel May 14 at 1:19
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    The additional question is whether AFCI is required for the 20 amp circuit. If so, pigtails or AFCI receptacles are the only option - AFCI or GFCI breakers can't accept more than one set of wires (hot and neutral). – PhilippNagel May 14 at 1:58
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You can't have 2 outlets on a 50A branch circuit in a house for non-cooking appliances

NEC 210.23(C) prohibits putting 2 outlets on a 50A branch circuit in a house unless you are supplying cooking appliances only, which is not the case for you:

(C) 40- and 50-Ampere Branch Circuits. A 40- or 50-ampere branch circuit shall be permitted to supply cooking appliances that are fastened in place in any occupancy. In other than dwelling units, such circuits shall be permitted to supply fixed lighting units with heavy-duty lampholders, infrared heating units, or other utilization equipment.

Not only can you not have 2 outlets on 1 50A branch circuit in a house, but you can't put 2 electric car chargers on 1 circuit anywhere

Even if this wasn't in a house, your situation with the 50A outlets is still no good, because of NEC 625.40:

625.40 Electric Vehicle Branch Circuit. Each outlet installed for the purpose of charging electric vehicles shall be supplied by an individual branch circuit. Each circuit shall have no other outlets.

  • And by "outlet" they mean "point of use", not "receptacle". So hardwiring to bypass the receptacle buys you nothing. – Harper May 14 at 16:24
  • Thanks. I think I'll hardwire two tesla wall chargers, to discrete breakers, and they will smartly do the right thing re overall load – samsmith May 14 at 23:48

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