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I live in Northern California. My roof is 8 years old and was intalled by a licensed contractor and has never leaked. However, a roof inspector says my roof is not up to current building standards that would require the use of ridgecap shingles. Apparently the contractor that installed my roof used a different technique on the ridgeline. I can see that the ridgecap shingles are what is recommended but are they the only approach that is certified by a roof inspector.

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    It is not clear to me that you are required to correct something like this, but if you are, then I would think you would ask the original contractor to redo the ridges with the recommended shingles. – Jim Stewart May 8 '19 at 14:09
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    Context would be helpful. Things already built are generally not subject to "new and evolving standards" until they are re-built or re-modeled (or in the case of roof shingles, replaced.) So if the roof as built met the standards when it was built, that is normally fine. The nature of or reason for the "roof inspector" or "certification" might also shed some light here. If the job was sub-standard as/when built and the contractor still can be found, you could certainly try to have them fix it... – Ecnerwal May 8 '19 at 14:47
  • I am selling my home hence the roof inspection. The inspector has stated that not using the ridgecaps is an improper installation. The roof was installed 8 years ago and has never leaked. The buyer is asking that we make the repair. I am okay with this if it is truly a problem. Is it possible as with most building codes that are constantly updated that 8 years ago using ridgecaps was not a common practice? – murray – murray May 8 '19 at 17:42
  • My roof was replaced a few years ago and trimmed regular shingles were used for the ridges .Insurance was paying because the old roof was damaged by hail. And I have a mortgage , so there must have been 3 or 4 inspections ( Insurance , mortgage, and city). They thought trimmed shingles were fine in TX. Either the problem is CA or the inspector is justifying his job. I think you are stuck with doing what ever he wants. – blacksmith37 Feb 3 '20 at 23:40
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I agree with Jim Stewart and Ecnerwal that it’s highly unusual that a Building Inspector would require you to change anything, unless you are doing a re-roofing project.

If you want to argue with him, I’d ask him to review Appendix J of the Code for existing construction, especially if it’s not leaking.

Here is GAF Roofing’s installation instructions for typical ridge cap installation. Each manufacturer will have slightly different installation instructions, but will all be similar.

https://www.gaf.com/en-us/document-library/documents/productdocuments/residentialroofingdocuments/ridgecapshinglesdocuments/ridgecapshinglespremiumdocuments/ridglassdocuments/Ridglass_Ridge_Cap_Shingles_Application_Instructions_English_Spanish_French.pdf

If you have a ridge vent, here is a site for that:

https://www.gaf.com/en-us/roofing-products/residential-roofing-products/ventilation-and-attic-vents/exhaust/roll-ridge-vents/cobra-ridge-runner

Perhaps, what the inspector saw was a modified ridge cap made from regular shingles, (which is often done,) but he may not be familiar with that technique.

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  • I am selling my home hence the roof inspection. The inspector has stated that not using the ridgecaps is an improper installation. The roof was installed 8 years ago and has never leaked. The buyer is asking that we make the repair. I am okay with this if it is truly a problem. Is it possible as with most building codes that are constantly updated that 8 years ago using ridgecaps was not a common practice? – murray May 8 '19 at 17:37
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    Hmmm...No, ridgecaps have been common for 50 - 60 years. In fact, wood shake roofs have had to make their own ridgecaps by nailing two shakes together for longer than that. I’d be careful installing the right kind of ridgecap. If your current condition allows the attic to vent, then be sure to use vented ridgecap. When I sell a house, I give the buyer a few bucks to fix what he wants to rather than fix it myself. The buyer may not like the way you fixed it and ask you to do it again, and again... – Lee Sam May 8 '19 at 17:52

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