3

My company recently moved into an office, that has an attached warehouse. The warehouse used to be a paint booth, so there is layers and layers of paint and gunk on the floor. It also has a lot of chips, gouges.

We are planning on putting an AC in, and putting heavy (2-4k lbs) circuit board assembly equipment in it. The floor needs to be strong, smooth, and easy to clean.

Af first I thought we should epoxy it, but there is so much gunk I worry it will never stick. Now I'm thinking of renting a floor grinder from home depot, and working on polishing the floor.

The problem is, the people at my local home depot, don't seem to know anything about these tools. I was recommended against the heavy duty edco grinder, and instead told to get a smaller Clark surface maintainer.

Also, home depot doesn't seem to have progressive diamond grit blades to truly polish the floor. If you want to check what my home depot has, the address is 10550 Park Blvd Seminole, FL 33772

I think my best bet is to use whichever grinder you recommend, get the gunk and crap off, then work on filling the cracks and spalling with self lever or filler? Not sure on which to use either. Then to rent the grinder again, and polish/grind it all again.

Looking for any guidance or suggestions. Really can't afford a professional, as the going rate for polishing around here is up to $10 sqft. Our space is around 700 sqft.

enter image description here

enter image description here

  • 1
  • 2
    @Alaskaman I have found a lot of people at my local Home Depot who know what they are doing - generally those who worked in trades and are now semi-retired. And I have found a lot of people at Home Depot who don't have background/knowledge but who are enthusiastic & provide fantastic customer service. But sometimes you need technical help and all you can get is customer service "if it doesn't work bring it back and we'll refund your money" but you really want to know "which widget is best for me" and they can't tell you. Each visit is different - luck of the draw. – manassehkatz May 3 at 19:02
  • 2
    I was one of those people at HD during the recession and get quite tired of the broad-brushed jabs. Plenty of people I worked with were also knowledgeable and helpful. Thank you, @manassehkatz, for the reality check. – isherwood May 3 at 19:29
  • Kyle, what are you asking, exactly? "Any suggestions" posts are usually off-topic as too broad. We're not a discussion forum, so you need to ask an actual question that can be clearly understood and answered. Is it about grinder type, or crack repair, or what? – isherwood May 3 at 19:33
  • I shop at home depot and lowes every week, My sarcastic comment is informed from my experiences over a long time. I did not say that ALL home depot associates are not knowledgeable but in my experience they are not knowledgeable more often then not. in my comment I quoted the OP "the people at my local home depot, don't seem to know anything about these tools" and added, what a shocker. I go to home depot only if i have to. – Alaska Man May 7 at 1:57
2

As Kris already indicated with a link in a comment, the solution for "big" equipment is usually not Home Depot. Some Home Depot rental departments are better than others, so you may have better luck if you check other area stores. But there are plenty of places where the only thing they do is rent equipment, so they:

  • have a larger variety of equipment available than an "everything" store
  • often have lower prices, since this is their specialty
  • are more likely to have someone on staff who can give a little advice instead of being just an order-taker

A typical place won't require anything special to rent a floor polisher or most other equipment, though it helps if you come in seeming reasonably knowledgeable about what you are trying to do and what kind of equipment you need.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.