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Ok. So my range has burned off one of the 2 black wires on the terminal block, which I'm assuming was due to a loose connection. My whirlpool range goes to a 50A breaker. There is 2 red /1 white/ 2 black (10AWG/14AWG) hot wires . I was told to replace the black wire with a #6 wire but I'm confused with finding the right wire. Most wires seem to be labelled as AWG. The burned cable says it's a 14 AWG cable so wouldn't I be looking for that instead of a #6 wire? Also the wire says it's rated for 150 c temperature but most wires aren't rated that high. I have a 14 AWG 90 c wire, would that be able to handle the heat of the range?

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  • What model is the stove? – ThreePhaseEel Apr 30 at 22:18
  • It's a whirlpool electric range model #WFE505W0HZ1 – Jonathan Cabrera May 1 at 2:43
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The #10 wire is too small coming from a 50 amp breaker. #10 or 10awg wire is only rated for 30 amps by code - this is why someone advised you to change to #6.

Just to make sure we are talking about the same wire, there should be #6 or #8 coming from the breaker to the range. If the wire that burned off is inside the range going to let's say an element or burner, then stay with the same size wire (high temp fixture wire). Since you are talking about #14 I am guessing it goes to an element. The important thing about connections at elements is that you use connectors rated for high temp, for example many oven elements are male spade disconnect type connectors. Using a standard female crimp connector will have you back in there because the standard ones can not handle the heat. The ones I use on ovens are rated for 900f. So when replacing the wire if crimp connectors are used at the element use high temp ones or splice a piece on the existing wire using a high temp wire nut.

  • It's the wire that goes from the range to the terminal block. I added a picture for clarity. The smaller black wire that got damaged says it was a 14 AWG 150 c wire and I had a 14 awg wire but only rated at 90 c temperature. Would I need to get one that was also rated to 150 c? – Jonathan Cabrera Apr 30 at 19:31
  • Yes you need "fixture wire" this is usually rated to 150. Saying the wire was on the terminal block did not answer where it goes from there but I am guessing inside the range someplace. The NEC limits 14 awg wire to 15 amps but 14 gauge wire inside an appliance that is listed can handle close to 90 amps if memory serves. The very important part here is the high temp wire insulation and at least the same size or larger inside the range. – Ed Beal Apr 30 at 19:38
  • Ok. Thanks. It seem the wire leads to the circuit board of the control panel. It has "Blue" written next to it. So I should just forget about 6 gauge wire and find some 14 awg fixture wire? – Jonathan Cabrera Apr 30 at 20:08
  • Yes the 6 gauge would be from the breaker to the range, I did look up 14 awg within an enclosure and it can handle 100 amps with the correct insulation so 14 age fixture wire should do the trick. – Ed Beal Apr 30 at 20:12
  • Ok. Thanks for help! Hopefully it's not too hard to find. – Jonathan Cabrera May 1 at 2:45

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