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I bought a "Jacuzzi" brand bath tub - standard size (30x60) with jets - to replace old "normal" tub.

I can do the plumbing/finishing, but not sure about the wiring code requirements.

So far i understand: - wet location so need GFCI - dedicated 20A circuit for pump, and another one for heater if I add a heater - timer/switch at least 5 feet away

Do I mount a GFCI outlet inside the "trap access opening" ? Can i use normal 12/2 NM (Romex) ?

Also not sure where to mount timer/switch or what switch to buy (it did not come with one). Where would you mount the timer/switch - this is a standard small bathroom 6x8. So on the opposite wall by the vanity sink to be at least 5 feet away?

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You can't put a GFCI receptacle inside the "trap access opening" because it has to be accessible so you can reset it. But that's alright; GFCIs can sit anywhere and protect a load "down the line" from it.

A good reason to do that is if the GFCI is too close, its protection is not total. If the GFCI's Line terminals get wet, that can still carry an electric shock to you even if the GFCI trips.You're actually better off installing a GFCI far away from the thing you're protecting.

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One possible place is right in the service panel using a GFCI breaker. If it's a dedicated circuit that goes only to the hot tub, that makes a lot of sense.

12/2 cable is fine for the 20A motor circuit. You didn't say what current the heater is; if it's 20A then #12 is fine. If it's 30A you need #10.

If the heater is 120V-only or 240V-only, then /2 cable will suffice. If it is 240/120 with neutral (which would surprise me), you need /3. You also need a GFCI on the heater. If it's a 240V heater, that is only possible as a GFCI breaker.

You definitely want the GFCI protection before the timer. First to protect you while you're operating it, and second because cutting power to a GFCI is bad for the GFCI and will cause nuisance trips.

The installation instructions for the jacuzzi will tell you officially what cable and breaker sizes to use. Those instructions are approved by Underwriter's Labratories as part of its UL Listing. You must follow them because the validity of the UL listing depends on following the instructions. (Code, NEC 110.3B).

  • thanks. Still not sure where to pull the wire for the Timer/Switch. It has to be 5 ft away from nearest edge of the tub, so where do people normally put this? It would be almost close to the furthest wall where the vanity is (vanity is parallel with tub on the opposite wall) – tino Apr 6 at 18:51

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