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Context: a Florida roof and gutter is to be replaced, however the fascia wood was rotten and replaced. The plan is to be covered by aluminum fascia and has a drip edge.

  1. When does it make sense to paint the wood boards?
  2. Does it make sense to paint if Aluminum fascia is to be nailed to the board?

The goal is to have the building ready for the gutter craftsman.

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Exposed wood must always be sealed in some fashion unless it's chemically treated or of a species that's rot-resistant (cedar, teak, etc.). Even then it tends to preserve the aesthetics of wood to paint, oil, or varnish it.

Metal fascia is commonly installed right over "subfascia" (raw SPF 2x6 lumber). If everything is installed correctly it should never see water.

  • Thanks isherwood. Is it possible to determine (visual inspection) if the wood is chemically treated? Ideally it would be possible to look at the photo and determine if it has been treated. I think that you are indicating that if the wood is treated, that the aluminum fascia is nailed to the wood and is ready for the gutter crew? – gatorback Mar 23 at 14:32
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    It'll be unnaturally green or brown, and it'll be wet and heavy when you buy it. – isherwood Mar 23 at 14:33
  • @isherwood I have no idea about the US timber industry, but in the UK pressure-treated timber is certainly not "wet and heavy". It has the same moisture content as untreated timber when sold. Lower quality dipped timber may have more moisture, but the cheaper initial price is usually less cost-effective because its lifetime is shorter. – alephzero Mar 23 at 16:05
  • @alephzero, are you saying that the lumber manufacturers dry the lumber again after it's pressure treated in vats of liquid? – isherwood Mar 23 at 17:31

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