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I am doing a quick fix on an existing plywood, unfinished floor. I need to fill the gaps between boards before staining, then applying polyurethane.

I have plenty of Minwax Stainable Wood Filler to complete the job, but have read horror stories from others who say it is not as stainable as it should be. I have also read that some use it for their floors, though the container states "Not For Use On Hardwood Floors". Since plywood is not hardwood, does that statement still apply?

Since I have the MinWax filler already, I wish to use it, but if this isn't a good option, can you please suggest an alternative. I have heard that FamoWood latex filler would be a good choice. Any comments on that product for this use would be appreciated.

closed as off-topic by ThreePhaseEel, Tyson, Daniel Griscom, Machavity, Jerry_Contrary Mar 22 at 17:58

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There is no good filler for every purpose all wood and all fillers take stain differently. When they say "sands and stains like wood" they are misleading you. Different sections of the same tree stain differently. That's why quarter sawn lumber is desirable. You need to try a swatch in a descret location. Or better on a sample. Finding something to match plywood may be a bit tricky. I'd avoid putty. Try to get a filler of the matches the species of wood, if you are able to identify it. Another method is to make your own filler out of fine sawdust of the same material, if you have a peice available. You make a thick paste of the sawdust and wood glue and apply it as filler. It's very hard to get a seamless finish and the colour of the stain will make a big difference as to how noticeable it is.

  • All of that is what I'm gathering from my research too, Joe. I think there is no real answer except to test it for myself, which I feel I have accomplished (except for how it will hold up over time). Thank you for taking the time to respond. It's great to have the opportunity to have input from those more experienced. Blessings! – Shellie Smith Mar 14 at 19:18

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