4

I'd like to add a small window to a blank wall above a tub/shower, without removing all of the tile (interior) or stucco (exterior) below the new opening to add jack studs. Is that possible, using framing angles on the existing studs?

One of the 2 studs that would be "promoted" to a king stud is already doubled 2x4s. The window would use 3 stud bays (cutting 2 existing studs). The work would not be inspected. The header would sit against the top plate (so no studs above the opening).

8

Yes, but you'd need to repurpose existing common studs as jack studs. This may mean using a wider (longer) header than would ordinarily be needed. Obviously this means opening up the wall more than you'd maybe like, but it's all kept up above the tub where it's more easily repairable.

_________________________________________________
_________________________________________________  <-- double plate
_________________________________________________  <-- top plate


                   header

________________________________________________
| |    | | |                        | | |    | |
| |    | | |                        | | |    | |
| |    | | |                        | | |    | |
| |    | | |                        | | |    | | <-- existing common
| |    | | |        rough           | | |    | |     stud, cut to 
| |    | | |       opening          | | |    | |     header height
| |    | | |                        | | |    | |
| |    | | |                        | | |    | |
| |    | | |                        | | |    | |
| |    | | |                        | | |    | |
| |____|_|_|________________________|_|_|____| |
| |__________________________________________| |
| |             | |            | |           | |
| |             | |            | | <-------- | | --- existing common studs
| |             | |            | |           | |     cut off at sill height

If this is a load-bearing wall, you probably want to install a temporary wall just inside the tub to support the joists. Chances are the wall as a system will carry the weight, but you want to prevent drywall cracks, etc.

  • Pre-cut a few studs to the ceiling height minus 3", and cut two plates suitable for the space.
  • Pad a 2x4 plate with a blanket or other padding to protect your ceiling. Have an assistant hold the plate against the ceiling, perpendicular to the joists.
  • Set a plate on the floor below it.
  • Tip your pre-cut studs in place, setting one end and driving the other with a hammer until plumb (or snug, whichever comes first). Spare your ceiling and drive the bottom end where possible.
  • Try to position one stud roughly under each joist.
  • Friction will more or less hold everything in place, but run some 3" gold screws in on a toenail angle to be sure.

Keep an eye on things as you start to work on the window opening. Watch upper floors for movement at doorways, etc. There shouldn't be any.

  • 6
    This is some outstanding ascii art! – batsplatsterson Mar 8 at 18:57
  • Awesome. In this case t's a single story, no attic, lightweight shingles, and abutting the corner of the original house, so there shouldn't be a lot of drama. – Phil Esra Mar 8 at 19:10

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