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I have an older house (1940’s) with a dip in the hallway leading to my downstairs (1st floor) bathroom. From wall to wall the hallway is 14 feet with the wood floor joists below running parallel to the length. I ran a line level and found the floor is dipped 2 1/4” max at about 1/3 of the length of the hallway. This 1/3 length point is closer to the bathroom.
Here’s what I’ve done so far:

  • Looked for cracks in the floor joists from the basement. No cracks were found.
  • Pulled tile up in the hallway to find that the previous owner tried minimizing the dip with the addition of plywood where the dip is at its lowest and blended the tile around it in.
  • Had a few foundation repair companies come take a look. They both suggested jack/post systems to prevent any further dipping, but not a solution to level the floor. One quoted $2600 and the other $5600 for their specialized jack/post system. Again, the jack/posts they said would be used to support the joists, but wouldn’t do anything about the floor dip. They felt that the dip was caused by the joists getting wet at some point and warping. These joists are old rough hewn 2x8’s.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

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  • Hello, and welcome to Home Improvement. Would you post a picture of the basement joists in the affected area? – Daniel Griscom Feb 13 at 3:35
  • Is it just the hallway floor that dips not the area on either side ? – Ed Beal Feb 13 at 22:46
  • It is most noticeable in the hallway, but there is a slight dip on the other side of the wall (kitchen and living room). – Andrew Hewins Feb 14 at 2:43
  • I spoke with a carpenter today who said he thinks the joists dipped due to the weight from the second floor addition that was installed many years ago. He suggested running a beam perpendicular to the joists in the area of the dip, jacking the dip level, and installing 2 lally columns. – Andrew Hewins Feb 14 at 2:49
  • I’ve been trying to upload a photo of the joists, but am apparently technologically challenged on here. I took some string and ran it from the joist supports on either side of the basement (parallel one of the joists in the affected area). Although not very accurate due to wiring and joist cross-bracing partially obstructing the string from riding up the joist...there is 1.5” of dip in the bottom of the joist. I’m thinking that the carpenter’s solution is valid. – Andrew Hewins Feb 14 at 3:20

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