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I am creating a window shutter to go over my window; the shutter is made out of drywall (the purpose is soundproofing fyi). The shutters will be hinged so they can open.

Each shutter will have 2 hinges vertically and will weigh approximately 17.5 pounds. It will be about 2 feet wide and about 4.5 feet tall.

In general, when open it will be opened all the way so it is not hanging outwards.

Moreover, on the outer side under the hinge, I will have a 1/8" piece of plywood that runs the vertical length, maybe 2-3 includes wide.

On the inner side, instead of it only going into the drywall, there will be a 1x2 piece of wood running the height of it.

So, the screws for the hinges will go through like this (bird's eye view, from above):

Screw
..... ⬇
──╫── Hinge
──╫── 1/8 plywood
══╬════════════════ 5/8" drywall
──╨── 1x2" lumber

So, the drywall is sandwiched in between 1/8" plywood and 1x2 lumber. I thought this way on both sides it is reinforced.

To be clear, although not shown in picture, the 1x2 is a free-floating strip that is separate from the studs. It is attached to the underside of the shutters only.

The other side of the hinge is screwed directly to the studs on the frame.

Here is a quick photoshop demonstrating intent.

enter image description here

Will this work, or how much weight can a piece of 5/8" drywall hold?

  • if plaster-board gets damp it will warp under its own weight. Seriuosly consider MDF, particle board or plywood instead, in this town off-cuts of MDF and particle-board can be had from the a kitchen cabinet maker at no cost. – Jasen Feb 1 at 8:47
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From what you describe it should work but better would be to also glue those wood strips to the face of the drywall pieces using some construction adhesive.

I think it will look a but hokey and crude, especially with the open raw edges of the drywall all around.

  • Well with paint, and a curtain over top, it will look very nice IMO. It will satisfy the functionality desired for the time I am at this particular place. Can you clarify your reason for the glue? – diy user Jan 30 at 22:44
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    The glue comes into play because it will hold the whole shutter piece solidly referenced to the screws through the wood pieces. Without the glue the drywall over time is apt to move some and the screw holes through the drywall can easily (very easily) become enlarged allowing the drywall to move to a different position. – Michael Karas Jan 31 at 0:20
  • In my part of the world, you can find 'j trim' that will allow you to finish the edge of the drywall. And +1 to construction adhesive. – Aloysius Defenestrate Feb 1 at 2:48
  • @MichaelKaras Thank you for the tip. Excellent tip. – diy user Feb 1 at 14:38

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