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How do I wire my new oven with 4 wires, red black white and bare ground to my 240 service with black wire with red stripe, black and a bare ground. Thanks in advance for your help.

marked as duplicate by Machavity, Daniel Griscom, DoxyLover, isherwood, mmathis Feb 1 at 16:03

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  • Can you post a photo of the inside of the box? Is running a ground wire back to the panel an option for that matter? – ThreePhaseEel Jan 24 at 23:42
  • It sounds like the new oven might be a 120/240V device, which would require a neutral wire. While the circuit is a 240V circuit, which lacks a neutral. Can you post the make and model of the "oven"? – Tester101 Jan 25 at 1:45
  • Called an electrician friend. White netural will be tied together with the bare ground. Red will hook to black and red wire , and black to black . Thanks for your feedback. – Larry Jan 25 at 8:28
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    @Larry That sounds like an incredibly bad idea. Never, ever abuse the ground when you need a neutral wire. If an appliance needs a neutral wire, it has some 120V components in it and some current will flow into the neutral. If your ground gets broken at some point in the future, all kinds of appliances all over the house will suddenly have mains voltage on all their outer metal parts (which were supposed to be grounded). If you don't want to get anyone killed, run a new neutral wire. – TooTea Jan 25 at 10:26
  • @TooTea -- you are right in the sense that bootlegging ground off neutral is a Bad Idea; however, you can't just "run a new neutral wire" unless you're working in conduit. Running a new ground wire is an option, though, since it can take a different path to the panel than the rest.... – ThreePhaseEel Jan 25 at 12:42
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If you dont have a White (Neutral) wire you will not be able to run the little things, like the timer, clock, lights, rotisserie, etc. Just the oven elements (and maybe the top elements, but not sure on that one).

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