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We bought a mobile home to use for my office/studio workshop. It's 24 by 60, gutted out with no inside walls, and live in a desert area. The roof leaked and the insulation got wet and ruined. We cannot afford 1000+ to buy new insulation. Have been looking into shredded newspaper, pillow or mattress stuffing, polyfiber fill for quilts as I can get stuff like that cheap enough. Anyone ever do anything like that?

  • I'm not sure where you got your $1,000. You can purchase cellulose, a very good insulation and the blower is often free. It's an easy DIY project and I'd guess that you'd spend at most $200 to achieve R-20, maybe $300 to get twice that. – isherwood Jan 22 '19 at 16:00
  • Do you know about the Habitat for Humanity store? – Harper - Reinstate Monica Jan 22 '19 at 22:32
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Have been looking into shredded newspaper, pillow or mattress stuffing, polyfiber fill for quilts as I can get stuff like that cheap enough

That was the insulation of yesteryear. You can still tear apart some very old homes and find them lined with newspaper. So why did we stop using stuff like that?

  1. Fire resistance. Newspaper burns like... well, newspaper. Standard polyfill stuffing will burn almost as readily. Fiberglass and cellulose insulation (which is ironically made from sources like newspaper) is designed to have some fire resistance.
  2. Thermal resistance ("R value") - Newspaper is better than nothing, but it's thin paper. It's not designed to resist thermal change. Neither is polyfill. Polyfill has a slight edge because it can trap air (which is what most insulation does since air is a good thermal resistor) but it's still not designed to do that.
  3. Pests - Most insulation is treated with something to make it somewhat resistant to pests. It won't stop a squirrel or rat from making a nest, but they won't be looking at cellulose insulation as a food source either.

I would save up to buy the insulation you need instead of trying to do this on the cheap.

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    There's also the problem of toxicity when it burns. That's a big problem with styrofoam, for instance. The stuff will kill you with its smoke before you even feel any heat. – Harper - Reinstate Monica Jan 22 '19 at 22:22

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