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I recently removed the tile and a toilet for a bathroom reno to discover that the flange was completely rusted and the tile had been installed directly on the plywood subfloor. I removed the old flange with a Drenmel.

I need to install 1/4 inch cement board and then tile so my floor level will be raised by at least a half an inch. Which will be higher than the lip of old PVC flange rim(sorry I don’t know what that piece is called)

Can anyone please advise what the correct product would work as a replacement flange? I was thinking the Sioux Chief Push Tite or something similar. But I’m unsure if I can install those products with the pvc portion of the old flange (that lip the metal ring sits under) still connected to the PVC sewer pipe. All of the videos and diagrams I have seen install directly into the straight sewer pipe.

See attached picenter image description hereenter image description here

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If you need the extra height, just install a replacement flange that fits inside the existing pipe. There's both screw-tightening (where tightening bolts pushes a rubber gasket out to lock in place)

enter image description here

(Response to edit)

If you can get underneath (as your new picture depicts), you can avoid using an insert flange entirely. Cut the pipe off somewhere below, add a regular flange to a new pipe and just add a new coupler to attach the new to the old. Easier (and cheaper) than an insert.

enter image description here

  • Thanks Mach, I added an additional picture from the basement. It appears the pvc top is just part of the original flange essembly. Like a cap glued to the top of the pipe. And the rest of the plumbing is PVC. I guess my only concern with using a flange that inserts in to the 3” opening is that I have kids who tend to clog toilets. – Lauren Dec 5 '18 at 13:34
  • @Lauren Clogged toilets (which is fairly easy to do) really don't translate into clogged pipes, tho. The latter would be a serious problem if it happened with these. Remember, toilets are filled with all sorts of bends (waste has to clear the trap and typically make 3x 90-degree turns to exit). Once they hit the sewer pipe, it's almost always a clear shot. – Machavity Dec 5 '18 at 13:40
  • And while you have the room torn up, now is an excellent time to consider a newer toilet with a better flush mechanism. I bought some Kohlers a couple of years ago and not only do they use less water, they're super hard to clog. – Machavity Dec 5 '18 at 13:42
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    Lastly, if you can get underneath like this, you can avoid using an insert flange entirely. Cut the pipe off somewhere below, add a regular flange to a new pipe and just add a new coupler to attach the new to the old. easier (and cheaper) than an insert – Machavity Dec 5 '18 at 13:47
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    Since the op has access I would cut in a new flange it will cost a little less, I have used the inserts with no problems several times where I did not have access.+ add that comment to the answer since the op added photos and it will be worth an up vote for me. – Ed Beal Dec 5 '18 at 14:09

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