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During an inspection in this house which was built in 1913, we found this outlet that is a 3 prong with an open ground. I pulled it out to replace it with a 2 prong but am not sure what wires go where. I believe the top right wire on the socket is black, so there's black, white and red. I also think there's one other 3 prong socket on that wall that I'm guessing this runs to. I had a handyman with some electrical experience look at it but he wasn't quite sure so hopefully, someone can shed some light on how to do this. Thanks.

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    I started to write an answer, but this one may be more complicated. Short answer: Install a GFCI which will provide protection comparable to a ground wire even without an actual ground wire connected. If labelled correctly, that is 100% legal. However, the black/red (== two hots) with only one white/neutral makes me wonder if this is a split (half-switched, half-always-on) pair of receptacles, which complicates things a bit. Is one (or both) receptacle controlled by a switch? – manassehkatz Nov 14 '18 at 15:44
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    Looks half-switched to me? Replacing with a 2-prong outlet is legal, just be sure to break-away the tab on the hot side if it’s held switched. – Tyson Nov 14 '18 at 15:55
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    @manassehkatz that’s entirely possible, and likely the case if OP doesn’t know of a switch. It would be interesting to open up any switch in the room and find out if there is evidence of this. – Tyson Nov 14 '18 at 17:32
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    @manassehkatz personally I’d cap the red and stick with black and white. I would not combine them. While a GFCI is one solution that is a small j-box, If OP already has purchased his 2-blade receptacle with no ground, I’d just use that. – Tyson Nov 14 '18 at 17:40
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    @manassehkatz use black and cap red. Don't join them, that creates a parallel route, and you should never parallel... unless you are doing feeder so large that no MCM/kcmil sized wire is available to do it in one...and special apparatus on the feed side. – Harper Nov 14 '18 at 17:48

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