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I want to install a pot hanger in this pass through between my kitchen and dining room. The product came with some wood screw hooks, and I want to swap them for some threaded hooks and throw a nut on the other side of the header/top plate. Should I worry about any code things drilling through the header or mounting ~60 pounds of pots to it?

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  • How do you intend on throwing a nut on the other end?, is there an attic above? If there is solid wood above, I would think a carriage bolt or large screw hooks would hold 60 lbs, but maybe you're concerned someone will use it as a pull up bar. Are you going to bump your head walking through there? – Gary Bak Nov 2 '18 at 15:02
  • I have attic access on the other side. There isn’t solid wood like a big beam, but the 2x4s might be doubled up, can’t tell. The pass through has a counter 42 inches up, so you can’t walk through – Steve Cox Nov 2 '18 at 15:08
  • Do you know which way the ceiling joists run in the kitchen? From the header towards the cabinets or parallel with the header? – Gary Bak Nov 2 '18 at 15:20
  • I believe they run parallel (they definitely run parallel in the dining room) – Steve Cox Nov 2 '18 at 15:25
  • @isherwood I fixed the second image, should be right now. I want to drill straight through the framing of the opening, which is either the top plate of the kitchen wall, or the header of the opening on the dining room wall. Not sure the terminology here because the opening ends on the ceiling of another room – Steve Cox Nov 2 '18 at 17:06
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There have been studies done about the withdrawal force for various threaded fasteners, for example a single #10 screw can support over 100 pounds per inch that it penetrates the wood (Doug fir/hemlock). If you upgrade to a lag bolt its over 300 pounds per inch. Here is one of many documents.

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I don't see any problems doing this. You may want to drill the first hole down from the top plate to see where you'll end up in the ceiling below, then measure and mark your hole for the second and drill up. This should ensure you have a good spot for your bolt and washer on the center of the top plate, and not be skewed off on the side.

I'd also suggest using some Loctite and a double nut on each rod tightened against each other. The double nut will prevent it from working loose if the eyelet sinks into the drywall ceiling.

  • Yeah I was also considering threading a nut on the rod before feeding it through the whole so that I could secure it from both sides of the drywall and wood. The double nut probably means I don’t need the nut and washer showing. I’ll definitely drill from the top first especially since The chain hanging mechanism gives me a little leeway in the placement along the length of the header – Steve Cox Nov 2 '18 at 19:12

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