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I bought an old house and this is the old kitchen drain setup:

enter image description here

Frankly I never "tested" it before I remodeled the kitchen completely. The old kitchen has drop-in sink and now mine is under-mount.

With the new kitchen, I found out the garbage disposal is only 1" above the drain (I used a shallower sink vs. deep sink previously):

enter image description here

Here is another view:

enter image description here

To connect (A) + (B) to (C), I am thinking of two options:

  1. I need to find a new (D) so that P trap is lower a bit and I have to find a pipe with a short L shape at the end to connect to (C)

  2. Find some "built-in T shape P trap like this:

enter image description here

I am not sure if such thing exists.

The question is: What piece or how do I even create the connection from sink + garbage disposal --> drain pipe outlet?

UPDATE 1

So I was able to figure out the right "configuration" for this:

enter image description here

I made (A) longer and cut a 90 degree elbow really short (B). But that required me to push down the plastic drain pipe at the wall a bit, like 3/4" or so.

The result is that the connection in green circle above ended up at an angle like so:

enter image description here

There was no leak at that point so I was OK but then there was a leak below BUT I tried to use a bit of plumber putty inside and the leak stopped:

enter image description here

I know plumber putty is not supposed to be used in this case but I had no other choice. I hope it lasts for awhile but please tell me if otherwise. The reason it was leaking is "probably" because the whole P trap was pushed down 3/4", causing the "lip" not getting flushed to the "mouth" of the P-trap. I was just guessing...

  • Are you able to access the plumbing below the kitchen if you wanted to run a new drain pipe? I would have a concern with blockage if you have to run up hill with a flexible pipe especially with a garbage disposal. – HazardousGlitch Oct 31 '18 at 11:21
  • I do have access to plumbing but we're talking about removing drywall below basement and do whole bunch of work which could cost >$500. The "run up hill" is my #1 concern so that's why I wonder if there is some "creative" way to handle the 90 degree turn within 1" – HP. Nov 1 '18 at 5:04
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You can buy t shape pipes. Look for double sink drain plumbing. Extend your p trap down more. It will still be an uphill battle. I might also suggest opening the wall at the drain pipe and below. See if you can lower the pipes there.

  • I finally found a T shape pipe with one side threaded and one without thread. I cut the 90 degree elbow longer and pushed the entire P trap down 3/4" to create enough space. That resulted in my UPDATE 1 above. Please take a look and advise if I do something really wrong. I know plumber putty is no good but it works and if the leak won't ever occur again (or few years), I am fine with it. – HP. Nov 2 '18 at 4:25
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When no rigid piece is available to connnect the drain, a flexible drain connector often is the easiest way to go. I actually use them on all drains I renovate.

For example: https://www.homedepot.com/b/Plumbing-Pipes-Fittings/FLEX-Drain/N-5yc1vZbqpfZ81c

  • I use Flex drain pipes for bathroom vanity but I am not sure if it is reliable and strong enough for kitchen which is used many times/day and flush "objects", especially with vibration from the garbage disposal. Is this recommended? – HP. Oct 31 '18 at 6:02
  • Well where I live we do not tend to have garbage disposal in the drain, but I did connect my kitchen sink using a flexible drain pipe two years ago and since then and I never had any leaks nor blockages due to it. Seeing that a flexible pipe only costs a few dollars, why not try it and see it it works for you too? – user89225 Oct 31 '18 at 6:27

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