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enter image description hereHow to add a cord to this fixture?

I want to wire the white wire to the pull chain pendant light fixture.

White wire - which is ground which is hot?

Wires coming out of the Pendant light fixture

The cord:

White wire - which is ground which is hot?

Very confusing,where do I start and what do I do?

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    @JimStewart, there is no way that that base should be drilled or notched -- triply-so by one who is not expert at prototyping. At best, the OP should mount a surface-mount fixture box to a piece of finish-grade plywood and then wire the light to that (normally). The surface-mount box must be fitted with the proper strain-relief and a proper cord. I would not use the pictured cord in this scenario. – Brock Adams Sep 9 '18 at 19:19
  • This light fixture was designed to be attached to an electrical box in or on a ceiling or wall. Do you want to connect it to a cord so that it can be plugged in? If so, you should mount this fixture to a box as it is intended and then the cord would come out a hole in the box. – Jim Stewart Sep 9 '18 at 19:34
  • Yes Jim. Its for my garage and the garage is not finished, so it doesn't matter. Its just temporary. – CodeCola Sep 9 '18 at 20:10
  • >>The switch is supposed to be in the hot wire, and in your lamp the black goes to and from the switch. ... In your lamp base the black goes through the switch and was at one time connected to four smaller black wires, but the connection has been broken. I got the rest of the answer, but I do want the pull chain to work as it will be strung up high in the garage. How to wire this? – CodeCola Sep 9 '18 at 20:31
  • So? You can do proper permanent wiring for temporary work. I've done Code legal permanent wiring that I ripped out 2 hours later because I was done. It's no trouble at all. Double meaning there. – Harper Sep 10 '18 at 0:41
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The switch is supposed to be in the hot wire, and in your lamp the black goes to and from the switch. In the house wiring the hot wire is the one with the black insulation, the neutral has white insulation and the ground is often bare, but may be green insulation.

In your lamp base the black goes through the switch and was at one time connected to four smaller black wires, but the connection has been broken. If you want to connect a flat polarized grounded cord to this lamp, know that the center wire in the cord is the ground (connect to the bare wire in the fixture and, of the two outside wires, the smooth one is the hot (connect to black of light fixture) and the ribbed one is the neutral (connect to white of light fixture).

EDIT

If you want to do this, you would have to attach the fixture to an electrical box (e.g., a pancake box) which would be surface mounted where you want the lamp. The cord would come out a hole in the back or side of the box and the cord would have to have a "strain relief" on it. metal pancake box

But for all the trouble you'd have to go through (and some expense) to repair and adapt this fixture, it would be better to just buy a new fixture that is designed to do what you want.

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    Connecting that flat cord to that lamp will result in an eventual short and/or electrocution. A proper base for that lamp is required and the cord must be able to be properly strain reliefed (by a non-manufacturer). – Brock Adams Sep 9 '18 at 19:28
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    I have the base. I dont know wiring, but not naive or an idiot. I am confused due to all white in the plug cord. Its for my garage and the garage is not finished, so it doesn't matter. Its just temporary. – CodeCola Sep 9 '18 at 20:13
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    To answer your question, I don't like throwing things away that can be repaired, and increasing landfill. I like to repair and reuse things. – CodeCola Sep 9 '18 at 20:32
  • @CodeCola, no one called you an idiot. But the questions and comments show that you are not educated/aware of just how dangerous what you are attempting is. This is a case where you absolutely must know wiring. (Or follow directions to every jot and tittle and hope that some anonymous dude on the internet doesn't steer you to ruin.) – Brock Adams Sep 9 '18 at 20:39
  • >>just how dangerous what you are attempting is.. Hmmm....why? What is so special about this is? – CodeCola Sep 9 '18 at 20:50

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